• Diabetes Care
  • Pain Management
  • Weight Loss
  • Regenerative Medicine
Semaglutide Weight Loss Injections inClaymont, DE

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How Peptides Can Help Aid Your Weight Loss

Many people turn to peptide therapy to improve their overall health by enhancing their hormones. There are many types of peptides that can target specific areas of health, such as collagen peptides that can aid in the improvement of skin, hair, and gut health. Other peptides, including AOD 9604, CJC 1295, 7-Keto DHEA, Phentermine, and Semaglutide, can be incredibly useful for weight loss. Compared to vitamin supplements, peptide therapy operates differently since peptides are already present in the proteins in our bodies, making them easier to absorb and benefit from. Conversely, our bodies sometimes fail to absorb all nutrients from multivitamins, which are eventually excreted through urine.

When it comes to peptides for weight loss, you should remember that losing weight is a complex process that entails numerous factors, such as:

  • Genetics
  • Age
  • Exercise
  • Lifestyle
  • Diet

While peptides such as semaglutide can provide much-needed assistance in achieving your weight loss goals, they are most effective when combined with healthy dietary choices, regular exercise routines, and overall healthier lifestyle choices. If you have attempted various weight loss plans and diets but have not been successful, medical weight loss with the help of peptides may provide the extra push you need to achieve your goals.

Weight Loss Clinic Claymont, DE

Semaglutide in Claymont, DE: An FDA-Approved Aid for Modern Weight Loss

For those seeking to shed pounds and maintain a healthy weight, it can be a challenge to adhere to a consistent diet and exercise regimen. However, busy individuals and parents may find Semaglutide to be a helpful tool in their weight loss journey. This FDA-approved injection, which is used for both diabetes and obesity, works by stimulating GLP-1 receptors in the brain in order to facilitate weight loss and improve overall health in the long term.

You may be curious about the specifics of how this type of peptide functions. Semaglutide mimics glucagon in the body, which signals to the brain that you are satiated and do not need to eat more. When Semaglutide is taken, and you attempt to overindulge, your body sends a signal that says, "That's enough."

Semaglutide also slows down digestion, which reduces unnecessary snacking throughout the day. By reducing glucose spikes after meals, it reduces inflammation, which is crucial for overall health. Additionally, Semaglutide aids in insulin secretion by the pancreas regulates glucose levels in the body, and even has anti-aging and longevity properties. If you are struggling to lose weight, peptide therapies for weight loss, such as semaglutide can be a beneficial addition to your weight loss plan from Kennedy Health.

To wrap up, semaglutide in Claymont, DE can help you lose weight and keep it off by:

 Semaglutide Claymont, DE
stomach

Slowing down how much your stomach empties after mealtime helping you feel full longer.

blood glucose

Lowering the blood glucose levels in your body without causing them to fall too low.

food

Helps to quell your appetite and resist food cravings - the average patient eats around 30% less than usual.

 Weight Begins At Kennedy Health Claymont, DE

Who Should Consider Semaglutide for Weight Loss?

There are various medications that can be used to suppress appetite and promote weight loss for those struggling with obesity. However, semaglutide is a particularly promising option.

A recent study involving 2,000 obese adults investigated the impact of semaglutide when combined with a diet and exercise regime. The findings were compared with those who only made lifestyle changes without taking semaglutide. After 68 weeks, it was discovered that half of the participants who used semaglutide achieved a weight loss of 15% of their body weight, with almost a third losing 20%. On the other hand, those who solely adopted lifestyle changes lost an average of 2.4% of their weight.

Clearly, semaglutide is a reliable and effective supplement to aid your weight loss journey with Kennedy Health. However, who is the ideal candidate for this medication?

If you are an adult struggling with obesity, excessive weight, or weight-related medical conditions like high cholesterol or high blood pressure, semaglutide injections may be a suitable medication for you. To be eligible for weight loss services from Kennedy Health, like semaglutide injections, you must meet the BMI range criteria set by the FDA. If you are unsure about whether semaglutide injections are the right choice for you, we recommend scheduling a consultation with one of our weight loss practitioners today.

Is Semaglutide Actually Safe to Use?

At Kennedy Health, one of the most common questions our doctors and practitioners hear from patients is whether it's safe to take or not. It's understandable to be cautious about any medication that affects your body. However, to put it simply, this weight-loss medication is safe for you to take as long as you meet the criteria.

Semaglutide is even safe for patients with endocrine, kidney, heart, and liver conditions. As of June 4, 2021, the Food & Drug Administration has approved semaglutide injections (2.4mg once weekly) for chronic weight management in adults with obesity and at least one weight-related condition. Some conditions that may qualify you for semaglutide treatments include:

  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
 Wilmington Top Weight Loss Specialist Claymont, DE
Weight Loss Clinic Claymont, DE

What Happens if You Stop Taking Semaglutide in Claymont, DE?

Weight loss medications, like semaglutide, may lead to the regaining of lost weight once the treatment is discontinued. In a clinical trial published in Practice Update, it was found that participants had regained 11.6% of the body weight they had lost during treatment after a year of stopping semaglutide medication and lifestyle intervention.

The researchers believe that this weight rebound may be due to the reversal of the cardiovascular benefits of semaglutide treatment, such as regular blood sugar levels and blood pressure. This highlights the need for maintenance medication and ongoing treatment for obesity as a chronic health condition to safely overcome its effects on quality of life and heart health.

The bottom line is that since semaglutide is a hormone-based treatment, it's best to take it on a regular basis over a period of time for the best results. That length of time will vary from patient to patient and depends on factors such as:

  • The Weight You're Starting At
  • Your Long-Term Goals for Weight Loss
  • How Your Body Responds to Semaglutide Injections

3 Ways to Boost the Effects of Semaglutide in Claymont, DE

If you've been struggling with your weight for a long time, chances are you're ready to shed that weight as soon as possible. While semaglutide can certainly help, there are a few different ways to extend the effects of semaglutide therapy.

Curious whether you qualify for adding additional peptides to your personalized weight loss plan? Contact Kennedy Health today to speak with one of our specialists. It would be our pleasure to hear more about your goals and give you more info on the powerful benefits of peptide therapy for weight loss.

 Semaglutide Claymont, DE

Stick to a Healthy Diet

For successful weight loss, it is important to adhere to a diet that restricts calorie intake by avoiding foods high in fats and carbohydrates, while still providing the body with necessary nutrients and protein. When crafting your diet, try to eat healthy foods and drinks such as:

  • Lots and Lots of Water
  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Lean Proteins
  • Low Carbohydrate Foods

When you call Kennedy Health to learn more about semaglutide in Claymont, DE, be sure to enquire about healthy eating and weight loss plans tailored to your body and goals.

 Weight Begins At Kennedy Health Claymont, DE

Exercise Often

To lose weight, it is essential to consume just the right number of calories that the body needs and not exceed it. Once this is achieved, physical activity such as cardio and strength training can help to burn excess fat and strengthen muscles.

If you're struggling to get into an exercise routine to help you lose weight faster, start small and work your way up. Instead of sprinting down your street, go for a 45-minute casual walk around your neighborhood. With time, you can increase the amount of time you're walking and the briskness with which you walk. Eventually, you can work your way up to jogging and other more rigorous exercises, so long as they're suitable for your body.

 Wilmington Top Weight Loss Specialist Claymont, DE

Ask About Other Peptides from Kennedy Health

Kennedy Health sets itself apart from other weight loss and wellness clinics by offering a wide range of innovative supplements and medicines, as opposed to the typical one-size-fits-all weight loss plans. If you're accustomed to fad diets and fast weight loss solutions, you may be unfamiliar with peptides that can supplement semaglutide treatment. Some of those may include:

  • AOD 9604
  • CJC 1295
  • Ipamorelin
  • MIC Injections
  • 7-Keto DHEA
  • Phentermine

Here's How to Eat Healthy While Using Semaglutide in Claymont, DE

At Kennedy Health, our medical weight loss experts understand that sustainable weight loss isn't solely dependent on medication. Rather, it requires a combination of healthy eating habits, exercise, and lifestyle choices. For those seeking to enhance their weight loss journey, peptides like semaglutide can be beneficial. However, individuals often struggle with adhering to a healthy diet. If you're planning to undergo semaglutide treatment, remember these tips.

Be Mindful While You Eat

Mindful

To practice mindful eating, you need to be fully attentive and engaged while having meals. This means savoring the taste of your food, being conscious of your body's hunger and satiety cues, and steering clear of any distractions like gadgets or TV. By taking your time to eat, your body will feel fuller, and you won't feel big, bloated, or uncomfortable.

Try Eating More Whole Foods

Eating

One way to improve your eating habits is by focusing on incorporating whole foods into your diet. As mentioned above, this includes foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats. These types of foods are packed with important nutrients that can help you feel full and satisfied, while also supporting your overall health and well-being.

Stay Hydrated Throughout the Day

Hydrated

Staying healthy and losing weight requires drinking ample amounts of water. Experts suggest drinking 8-10 cups of water each day. To add some variety, consider incorporating low-calorie beverages such as herbal tea or infused water.

Try Meal Prep Planning

Meal

To maintain a healthy diet, it's a good idea to plan your meals ahead of time. Take some time each week to plan out what you'll be eating and snacking on, making sure to include a mix of protein, complex carbohydrates, and healthy fats. This will help you avoid making impulsive food choices and ensure that you always have nutritious options available when you're feeling hungry.

Tips and Tricks to Simplify Healthy Eating

If you're considering semaglutide in Claymont, DE, you should also be thinking about cleaning up your diet to get the best weight loss results possible. There are numerous ways to modify your diet, but not every method will be effective for you, as everyone's needs and reactions to different food groups vary. The key to achieving positive changes in your diet is experimentation. Determine what works for you and what you can consistently incorporate into your daily routine.

 Semaglutide Claymont, DE

Don't make things too complicated. The most important aspect of making a healthy diet change is to ensure that you can stick to it. Start by taking a simple approach and search for methods to make implementing changes easier for your lifestyle. There are plenty of resources available to assist with dietary modifications.

Here are just a few tips and tricks to help make healthy eating realistic for you:

  • Rather than eliminating foods, consider replacing them with healthier options.
  • Search for nutritious meal ideas online. There are countless recipes and ways to create yummy yet healthy meals on the internet. Use it to your advantage.
  • Stay hydrated and satisfied by drinking plenty of water. The more water you drink, the better you'll feel, within reason.
  • Take small, gradual steps to avoid feeling overwhelmed and to maintain consistency.
  • Start your day with breakfast to kickstart your metabolism and encourage healthy eating choices and habits.

It's important to keep in mind that everyone's weight loss and management journey is different and may involve a lot of trial and error. To figure out what works best for you in reaching your goals, make changes slowly and focus on one variable at a time. This way, you can identify which changes are effective and which ones may not be helpful. And always remember to rely on your primary care physician or weight loss specialist. At Kennedy Health, our semaglutide experts and weight loss professionals can help craft a customized weight loss and dieting plan that works for your body, not someone with your age and weight.

Life at a Healthier Weight Begins at Kennedy Health

 Weight Begins At Kennedy Health Claymont, DE

Are you looking to achieve a healthy weight and lead a productive life? Do you want to make a positive impact on yourself and your loved ones? Take the first step towards wellness by reaching out to Kennedy Health. We will work with you to understand your weight-loss needs while providing innovative strategies and therapies like semaglutide in Claymont, DE, to help you keep that hard-to-lose weight off for good.

Latest News in Claymont, DE

Big plans are afoot for iconic Claymont Steak Shop: A new building, and maybe a sports bar

First things first: Don't panic.But big changes are afoot at one of the oldest and greatest icons in the Delaware cheesesteak pantheon, the 57-year-old Claymont Steak Shop.Its owners, Basil and Demi Kollias, plan to tear down the old building and rebuild their restaurant in a brand new one, creating what they hope will be a better Claymont Steak Shop that can last another half century — expanded, spiffier, an...

First things first: Don't panic.

But big changes are afoot at one of the oldest and greatest icons in the Delaware cheesesteak pantheon, the 57-year-old Claymont Steak Shop.

Its owners, Basil and Demi Kollias, plan to tear down the old building and rebuild their restaurant in a brand new one, creating what they hope will be a better Claymont Steak Shop that can last another half century — expanded, spiffier, and maybe even with a patio and a sports bar. If they do it the way they've planned it, the steak shop wouldn't have to close for more than a week.

As it stands, the building would need a whole lot of work to stay in its current location.

"We had two choices," said Basil Kollias. "We could either sink a lot of money into a very old building, one that's already a patchwork from the last 60 years-plus, or we could tear it down and start fresh with something brand new and nice."

New and nice is the plan, they said.

Claymont Steak Shop is a revered tradition in Delaware

Demi Kollias takes the preservation of her family's steak shop seriously, she said, founded in 1966 by cousins and Greek immigrants Bob Hionis and Sam Demetratos.

She knows that she will hear from her customers if she changes anything too much.

It is, after all, the cheesesteak favored by our nation's president, whom Demi Kollias — like a lot of people in Delaware — tends to simply call "Joe." And for the record, the president's cheesesteak order is apparently provolone, fried onions and sweet peppers; customers still sometimes come in to order a cheesesteak the way the president does.

Where does Joe eat?:Some of Joe Biden's favorite Delaware foods

It is also where Delaware native Jim "Cheesesteak Adventure" Pappas, eater of a literal thousand cheesesteaks, said he first learned to love the holy quaternity of meat, cheese, onion and Italian roll.

The steaks at Claymont are very particular, said Demi Kollias.

The meat is ribeye, and a lot of it — as much as the roll can comfortably hold. No salt or pepper, even, unless you ask for it. Nothing but marbled meat. The onions are sliced twice daily and they look like onions, not diced-up cubes. New-fangled whiz is offered, but still frowned-upon compared to old-fangled American or provolone.

The bread comes from the same place as always, Serpe and Sons Bakery, custom-made for Claymont Steak Shop so the roll remains soft but still holds up to mountain of ribeye in each sandwich.

"There is quality," said Demi Kollias, "but there is also quantity."

New Claymont Steak Shop plans call for a mixed-use development on Philadelphia Pike

But even if Demi Kollias will not change her cheesesteaks, Claymont Steak Shop will change dramatically nonetheless.

The plans, wending their way through New Castle County's approval process since September, call for the current site of Claymont Steak Shop to be replaced by a side-by-side pair of three-story mixed-use buildings. The new Claymont Steak Shop, as well as some retail space for another tenant, would be on the first floor. The upper floors would house 19 apartments.

The Kolliases own property on both sides of their steak shop, and also undeveloped property at the rear that will accommodate the new parking spaces.

Presidential haunt:President Biden dines at 'old-school' Wilmington restaurant that holds memories

The plans would turn the cheesesteak shop into a new puzzle piece in the fast-developing Claymont neighborhood that Basil Kollias has been working to build as president of the board of the Claymont Renaissance Development Corporation.

There's the Darley Green residential development across Philadelphia Pike. The new Claymont train station. A host of new development plans at the former steel mill site that could bring as many as 5,000 new residents to the area, according to Claymont Renaissance Development Corporation executive director Brett Saddler.

The new steak shop, said Basil Kollias, will be integrated into a whole new Claymont.

More:Sneak peek of the new $90M Claymont transportation center, opening soon to rail commuters

Claymont Steak Shop will not have to close during construction. And may add a patio and a bar

The steak shop wouldn't have to close, Basil Kollias said — or at least, not for longer than a week.

The plan, on its face, is ingenious: The Kolliases will leave Claymont Steak Shop open while they start construction on a new building next door that will be home to the new restaurant space. When the new Claymont Steak Shop is ready to open, they'll simply turn off the lights at one place, and turn them on next door.

The decor will remain classic enough keep the feel of the old place, but still be shined up and modernized a little, they said. The biggest changes to the layout will happen in the back of house, where the kitchen can be made more efficient.

During phase two of construction, the original Claymont Steak Shop will be demolished, and a new building would go in with retail space at the bottom.

Depending on what the world looks like when the second phase of construction is finished — a process that will likely take years — Kollias may add a sports bar next door, following the same model that the pair pioneered at the newer Newark location. That way, customers can have both a cheesesteak and a beer at the same place. The Kolliases also hope to add a patio for outdoor dining on warm days.

"I think it will look great," said Demi Kollias. "And I think if we end up having the bar, it will be my husband's dream come true. Because he's gonna be the bartender."

Kollias, a real estate lawyer, politely turned down his wife's job offer.

Construction plans are still in the exploratory phase. But if all goes well, they hope to begin moving forward by the end of 2024. In the meantime, we wondered, does President Biden still stop by Claymont Steak Shop?

"The last time I saw him here, he was vice president," said Basil Kollias.

Demi gives him the kind of look that wives sometimes give husbands.

"I saw him when he was president, too!" she said. But before he was president, she said, it was casual. "You'd see Joe ..., at the register," she said.

Now, people from the Biden camp tend to call in their orders. Maybe, she said, you see the Secret Service come in.

And if they get a cheesesteak, they never say whether it's for Joe.

Matthew Korfhage is business and development reporter in the Delaware region covering all the things that touch land and money, and the many corporations who call the First State home. A longtime food writer, he also tends to turn up with stories about tacos, oysters and beer. Send tips and insults to [email protected].

New $90M+ Claymont rail station brings potential

CLAYMONT – Hundreds of people turned out Monday morning to celebrate the culmination of a project that many thought might never be completed: a new Claymont Transit Station.Replacing a smaller, aging rail station just to the south, the new station will serve as a major regional rail artery from Wilmington’s suburbs into the greater Philadelphia market via SEPTA train service. It also will be a hub for DART b...

CLAYMONT – Hundreds of people turned out Monday morning to celebrate the culmination of a project that many thought might never be completed: a new Claymont Transit Station.

Replacing a smaller, aging rail station just to the south, the new station will serve as a major regional rail artery from Wilmington’s suburbs into the greater Philadelphia market via SEPTA train service. It also will be a hub for DART bus service across the First State.

The more than $90 million project was made possible through more than $51 million in Federal Transit Administration funding, including a $10 million in a competitive U.S. Department of Transportation TIGER grant. The state contributed more than $38 million toward the project.

Brett Saddler, the executive director of the Claymont Renaissance Development Corp., a nonprofit that was formed to help plan and guide the revitalization of the unincorporated northern Delaware community that was home to both President Joe Biden and Gov. John Carney, said he was a bit in awe of the finished product.

“After 14 years of being asked by Claymont residents, ‘When are we getting that new train station you promised?’ … I can finally say today,” he said to applause from many of the locals who joined the ceremony.

SEPTA and DART service will begin at the new Harris B. McDowell III Transportation Center on Monday, Dec. 4, replacing the previous station on Myrtle Avenue that will be decommissioned and hoped to turn into a public trailhead. The new facility features a number of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) improvements, including elevators over the tracks and level platforms to trains.

The new facility also includes a 464-space parking garage that offers covered parking to Claymont commuters for the first time, and another 343 spaces on an outdoor lot, which in total increases available parking by about 60%.

While about 1,200 people use the Claymont station on SEPTA’s Wilmington-Newark line, Saddler believes those numbers will grow in coming years. That’s due in part to First State Crossing, a major redevelopment of the former Evraz steel mill adjacent to the train station, that is welcoming major employment centers like an Agile Cold Storage warehouse and a First Industrial Realty Trust facility.

Stephen Collins, executive vice president of St. Louis-based Commercial Development Company (CDC), which is investing millions into First State Crossing, said he considered it an “anchor” of the Claymont community and his company’s mixed-use project.

“Commuters will be able to come to work here and shop here, and we think it’d be a great asset for the community and the project,” he told Delaware Business Times, adding that CDC believes the opening of the station will prompt new interest from investors to look at the area.

CDC plans to build upward of 1,200 residential homes northeast of the train station, as well as additional retail and potentially a small number of offices.

“Obviously the commuter station will be a great asset to those people who want to live in Claymont, Delaware, where the taxes are much lower than they are in Philadelphia and New Jersey, and they can go up to the Hospital District or downtown Philadelphia to work,” Collins added.

The opening of the facility comes just a few weeks after President Biden announced $16 billion in new funding for Amtrak that would fix issues along its heavily traveled Northeast Corridor, which runs through Delaware. In a letter, the president, who famously rode Amtrak to Washington every week for more than three decades, congratulated state leaders in completing the new Claymont station.

“I know how much it matters to be able to get to work on time. I know how much it matters to get home and see your family after a long day. I know how frustrating it feels to be delayed at the station when something goes wrong. As president, I have worked relentlessly to make our transportation infrastructure faster, safer and more reliable for all Americans. And the Harris B. McDowell III Transportation Center sets the standard for what we should expect from new infrastructure projects,” he wrote. “[It] will better connect our communities, strengthen our economy and help chart the course of Claymont’s future.”

The president also congratulated McDowell, who was the longest-serving member of the General Assembly when he retired in 2021 with 45 years of service. The lifelong Claymont resident was honored with the naming of the transit station, in part because he was the godfather of climate change legislation in the state and advocated for a strong public transit system.

Many turned out Monday to celebrate his contributions and the naming of the new station.

“He has the ability to see the world not just as it is, but as it should, as it could be. When he sees injustice, he sees seeks to right it. When he sees environmental degradation, he seeks to advance justice. When he sees poverty, he seeks to expand opportunity. And today, this facility is named after a man who didn’t just see a different world, but help to deliver it,” said State Sen. Sarah McBride, who succeeded McDowell in representing the First Senate District.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with full cost figures for the project, moving it to more than $90 million.

Claymont Christmas Weed, a 30-year Delaware tradition, is celebrated at Saturday parade

The words "Christmas Weed" these days might mean something a little different than they did 30 years ago.But back in 1993, because of a resilient little fir growing in a crack in a highway, a very goofy Delaware holiday tradition began in Claymont and it endures to this day.There's even a well-attended Christmas parade, which started in 1998 and steps off this Saturday at 10 a.m. in Claymo...

The words "Christmas Weed" these days might mean something a little different than they did 30 years ago.

But back in 1993, because of a resilient little fir growing in a crack in a highway, a very goofy Delaware holiday tradition began in Claymont and it endures to this day.

There's even a well-attended Christmas parade, which started in 1998 and steps off this Saturday at 10 a.m. in Claymont, that's built around the tradition.

And a song. And a fable.

The backstory on the Claymont Christmas Weed

It all started on a slow news day on Dec. 16, 1993, a little more than a week before Christmas.

The late News Journal photographer Donaghey G. Brown snapped some sweet photos of a wild fir tree growing from a crack in Philadelphia Pike near the I-495 exit in Claymont.

The scraggly little thing was decorated with ornaments and gold garland, apparently by passing motorists or local residents.

One of the photos ran on the front page of The News Journal on Dec. 17, 1993, and a cheeky copy editor (and were there ever any other kind?) slapped on a headline: "O Christmas Weed."

In the news business, this is known as a "bright," a short, amusing story intended to delight newspaper readers as they sip their coffee.

That morning a lot of eyes saw Brown's uplifting photo, but apparently, not everyone found the humor.

The Delaware Department of Transportation, in particular, viewed the weed as a traffic hazard, not a holiday symbol. Cue the bah-humbugs.

In the interest of public safety, though some have described it as the ultimate Scrooge-y move, DelDOT, that same morning, chopped down "the weed."

A Yuletide throwdown began

Another tree went up, but, a short time later, it was stolen. And it happened again. And again.

Eight trees later, The News Journal, with the help of a local security company, stepped in and then-Executive Editor John N. Walston hired a guard to watch over "the weed" until Christmas Day.

Really. It should be noted, this was back in the day when newspapers were a lot more flush.

And just to put even more nutty icing on the fruitcake, former reporter/editor Al Mascitti wrote a fable called "The Christmas Weed," which appeared in The News Journal on Dec. 25, 1993.

Several readers wrote Letters to the Editor saying how much they enjoyed Mascitti's tale.

The 'Weed' today

The wacky Christmas Weed tradition continues and Barbara Harbin said she is not at all surprised.

"We say it represents Claymont. We're not pretty, but we're plucky. We are resilient and we keep coming back," she told Delaware Online/The News Journal in 2018.

The Claymont Christmas parade steps off at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 2, and runs along the Philadelphia Pike from Maple Lane Elementary to Darley Road. It concludes at noon.

The weed will be blessed and decorated at the Church of the Ascension at 3717 Philadelphia Pike, immediately after the parade. It is then placed on Philadelphia Pike.

Harbin, who had organized the parade and weed decorating since 2004, said in 2018 that no one tries to steal the weed anymore.

"It's famous now. It's so famous, people come from out of state to see it. Even DelDOT leaves it alone," she said.

Still, just in case anyone has sticky fingers or unkind intentions, there's a little added insurance so the weed stays put.

"We ziplock it to the post that's at the median," Harbin said.

The "weed" today remains true to its original roots. It's scrawny and about 4 feet tall, though Harbin admits "it doesn't look a whole lot like the first one."

"A couple of years back, we went out and dug it out of the woods. We used to do that every year, " Harbin said "but I got tired of tromping through the woods in the snow and rain."

Harbin said she made an executive decision in 2016: "I decided we're going to plant this sucker. I dug a hole in my yard and planted it. I just dig it up now and put it in a bucket every year. In January, I'll put it back in the hole."

Contact Patricia Talorico at [email protected] or 302-324-2861 and follow her on X (Twitter) @pattytalorico Sign up for her Delaware Eats newsletter.

Agile Cold Storage Selects Delaware Site For $170M Facility

A Georgia-based company will bring 130 new jobs to Claymont, Delaware, and invest more than $170 million over five years.Agile Cold Storage plans to build a 275,000-square-foot cold-storage facility in the New Castle County city as it meets demand from North American food manufacturers, processors, and growers.The project also will bring investment and industry to Claymont – a community still affected by past industrial closings – and support business at the Port of Wilmington and future operations at the proposed p...

A Georgia-based company will bring 130 new jobs to Claymont, Delaware, and invest more than $170 million over five years.

Agile Cold Storage plans to build a 275,000-square-foot cold-storage facility in the New Castle County city as it meets demand from North American food manufacturers, processors, and growers.

The project also will bring investment and industry to Claymont – a community still affected by past industrial closings – and support business at the Port of Wilmington and future operations at the proposed port expansion at Edgemoor.

Delaware Prosperity Partnership has worked with Agile Cold over the past year, and in late August supported Agile Cold’s request for Jobs Performance and Capital Expenditures grants from the Council on Development Finance. The grants provide up to $510,500 and $4.05 million, respectively, from the Delaware Strategic Fund.

Distribution of these grants is dependent upon the company meeting commitments as outlined to the CDF, which reviewed and approved Agile Cold’s request.

The company’s Agile Cold Claymont division will locate in First State Crossing, a brownfield property that previously was a steel mill, along Naamans Road. Employment opportunities will be available at the management and supervisor level, along with general laborers, forklift operators, inventory control, customer service and maintenance. More jobs could also become available through partner service providers.

Agile Cold specializes in blast freezing, layer/case picking, cross docking, export services, tempering and e-commerce and offers automation in warehouse receiving, storage and shipping and a multi-temperature storage network suitable for a wide variety of inventory.

The company, which was founded in 2020, operates two facilities in the Metro Atlanta area and is planning a third in Macon. Adding an automated multi-temperature warehouse in Delaware will allow Agile Cold to expand into the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast markets and help meet growing proximity-related demands for fresh, refrigerated and frozen foods and more frequent deliveries.

Delaware Governor John Carney said the facility will create “good jobs and economic investment” in the city of roughly 15,300 people.

“Their operations will build on Delaware’s strong foundation in food manufacturing and transportation, helping our region’s supply chain,” Carney said.

Check out all the latest news related to Delaware economic development, corporate relocation, corporate expansion and site selection.

Agile Cold Storage to build $170 million facility in Claymont with taxpayer help

A $170 million cold storage facility will one day replace a steel mill scrap yard in Claymont with the help of more than $4.5 million from Delaware taxpayers.Agile Cold Storage, a 3-year-old Gainesville, Georgia, company, plans to build a climate-controlled warehouse south of Naamans Road and west of the I-95 and I-495 interchange. The company will employ 130 people at the facility at an average annual salary of $56,000.It is one of two industrial projects planned at First State Crossing, ...

A $170 million cold storage facility will one day replace a steel mill scrap yard in Claymont with the help of more than $4.5 million from Delaware taxpayers.

Agile Cold Storage, a 3-year-old Gainesville, Georgia, company, plans to build a climate-controlled warehouse south of Naamans Road and west of the I-95 and I-495 interchange. The company will employ 130 people at the facility at an average annual salary of $56,000.

It is one of two industrial projects planned at First State Crossing, a large-scale mixed-use redevelopment of the Claymont steel mill property. The state Council on Development Finance on Monday approved a $4,560,500 grant for the project. The money comes from Delaware's Strategic Fund, a pool of state money directed toward business retention and attraction.

Who is Agile Cold Storage?

Agile Cold Storage stores and distributes products for other companies, acting as a third-party cog in the supply chain. The Claymont facility will be its first in the region — the company has two warehouses in Georgia with a third on the way.

Each warehouse serves between three and five customers, John Ripple, senior vice president for automation, told the Council on Development Finance on Monday. More than half of the Claymont facility will be dedicated to imported protein, Ripple said, which is stored for several months. Agile will bring an existing customer to Claymont and has a second lined up that will be moving its business from New Jersey's Port of Newark.

Ripple said the Claymont site was attractive because it is about halfway between the Port of Wilmington and the Packer Avenue Terminal in Philadelphia. Ripple said products imported to the Philadelphia port are being transported across the river to New Jersey and later driven back over to end users. Agile feels it can fit a need serving those companies and others at the Port of Wilmington, which has limited cold storage capacity.

There is a mix of uses around the property, including the Knollwood community just to the south. A truck entrance will be constructed at Ridge Road, and an employee entrance will be across from the Tri-State Mall property. The loading stalls will be on the opposite side of the building from Naamans Road.

The state grant

Agile's grant is the largest approved by the Council on Development Finance this year. It represents about a quarter of the Strategic Fund, which is the state's primary economic development resource.

Grant applicants are brought to the council by the Delaware Prosperity Partnership, a privately run organization set up by Gov. John Carney to oversee the state's economic development. Megan Kopistecki, DPP's senior manager for business development, emphasized the intense demand for cold storage facilities when presenting the project to the council Monday.

"More than 70% of all storage facilities in the U.S. were built before 2000, with the average facility more than 40 years old," she said. "Older facilities lack the taller ceilings and the wider column spacing that allow for increased inventory and more efficient operations."

Cold storage warehouses are more expensive to build than regular warehouses. Ripple also noted that Agile faces higher-than-usual site work costs given the property's previous use as a storage area and scrap yard for the steel mill.

The 130 jobs are due to be created in the three years after receiving funding. Typically, grant recipients face clawbacks if they don't produce the jobs in the agreed-upon timeframe.

Agile plans to build the facility in two phases beginning in September or October. The company still needs New Castle County approval before it can proceed. Construction will continue over roughly the next five years, Kopistecki said.

"Agile is looking forward to hiring our team members and servicing our customers starting next summer," Agile Cold Storage President and CEO Don Schoenl said in a statement.

What is in First State Crossing?

The former scrap yard was previously slated for office space, but First State Crossing developer Commercial Development Company of St. Louis, Missouri pursued industrial uses in the post-COVID office downturn.

Now, something of an industrial hub is forming around Naamans Road.

A 358,000-square-foot warehouse along Philadelphia Pike south of Naamans Road was the first part of First State Crossing to start construction. It is a regular speculative warehouse being built by First Industrial Realty, a Chicago-based real estate company.

It is expected to cost about $60 million and be completed in the first quarter of 2024, according to a June press release.

A separate proposal at the Tri-State Mall across Naamans Road from the Agile Cold Storage site has the approval to build a 525,000-square-foot warehouse. Developer New York-based KPR Centers has not announced a tenant. Demolition of the Tri-State Mall occurred earlier this year, and a small retail space included in the project is under construction.

Plans for First State Crossing include housing, retail and some office space. Local officials are also pursuing a riverfront park.

A new Claymont train station is expected to open in November before Thanksgiving, according to Delaware Transit Corp. CEO John Sisson.

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