• Diabetes Care
  • Pain Management
  • Weight Loss
  • Regenerative Medicine
Semaglutide Weight Loss Injections inEdgemoor, DE

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How Peptides Can Help Aid Your Weight Loss

Many people turn to peptide therapy to improve their overall health by enhancing their hormones. There are many types of peptides that can target specific areas of health, such as collagen peptides that can aid in the improvement of skin, hair, and gut health. Other peptides, including AOD 9604, CJC 1295, 7-Keto DHEA, Phentermine, and Semaglutide, can be incredibly useful for weight loss. Compared to vitamin supplements, peptide therapy operates differently since peptides are already present in the proteins in our bodies, making them easier to absorb and benefit from. Conversely, our bodies sometimes fail to absorb all nutrients from multivitamins, which are eventually excreted through urine.

When it comes to peptides for weight loss, you should remember that losing weight is a complex process that entails numerous factors, such as:

  • Genetics
  • Age
  • Exercise
  • Lifestyle
  • Diet

While peptides such as semaglutide can provide much-needed assistance in achieving your weight loss goals, they are most effective when combined with healthy dietary choices, regular exercise routines, and overall healthier lifestyle choices. If you have attempted various weight loss plans and diets but have not been successful, medical weight loss with the help of peptides may provide the extra push you need to achieve your goals.

Weight Loss Clinic Edgemoor, DE

Semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE: An FDA-Approved Aid for Modern Weight Loss

For those seeking to shed pounds and maintain a healthy weight, it can be a challenge to adhere to a consistent diet and exercise regimen. However, busy individuals and parents may find Semaglutide to be a helpful tool in their weight loss journey. This FDA-approved injection, which is used for both diabetes and obesity, works by stimulating GLP-1 receptors in the brain in order to facilitate weight loss and improve overall health in the long term.

You may be curious about the specifics of how this type of peptide functions. Semaglutide mimics glucagon in the body, which signals to the brain that you are satiated and do not need to eat more. When Semaglutide is taken, and you attempt to overindulge, your body sends a signal that says, "That's enough."

Semaglutide also slows down digestion, which reduces unnecessary snacking throughout the day. By reducing glucose spikes after meals, it reduces inflammation, which is crucial for overall health. Additionally, Semaglutide aids in insulin secretion by the pancreas regulates glucose levels in the body, and even has anti-aging and longevity properties. If you are struggling to lose weight, peptide therapies for weight loss, such as semaglutide can be a beneficial addition to your weight loss plan from Kennedy Health.

To wrap up, semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE can help you lose weight and keep it off by:

 Semaglutide Edgemoor, DE
stomach

Slowing down how much your stomach empties after mealtime helping you feel full longer.

blood glucose

Lowering the blood glucose levels in your body without causing them to fall too low.

food

Helps to quell your appetite and resist food cravings - the average patient eats around 30% less than usual.

 Weight Begins At Kennedy Health Edgemoor, DE

Who Should Consider Semaglutide for Weight Loss?

There are various medications that can be used to suppress appetite and promote weight loss for those struggling with obesity. However, semaglutide is a particularly promising option.

A recent study involving 2,000 obese adults investigated the impact of semaglutide when combined with a diet and exercise regime. The findings were compared with those who only made lifestyle changes without taking semaglutide. After 68 weeks, it was discovered that half of the participants who used semaglutide achieved a weight loss of 15% of their body weight, with almost a third losing 20%. On the other hand, those who solely adopted lifestyle changes lost an average of 2.4% of their weight.

Clearly, semaglutide is a reliable and effective supplement to aid your weight loss journey with Kennedy Health. However, who is the ideal candidate for this medication?

If you are an adult struggling with obesity, excessive weight, or weight-related medical conditions like high cholesterol or high blood pressure, semaglutide injections may be a suitable medication for you. To be eligible for weight loss services from Kennedy Health, like semaglutide injections, you must meet the BMI range criteria set by the FDA. If you are unsure about whether semaglutide injections are the right choice for you, we recommend scheduling a consultation with one of our weight loss practitioners today.

Is Semaglutide Actually Safe to Use?

At Kennedy Health, one of the most common questions our doctors and practitioners hear from patients is whether it's safe to take or not. It's understandable to be cautious about any medication that affects your body. However, to put it simply, this weight-loss medication is safe for you to take as long as you meet the criteria.

Semaglutide is even safe for patients with endocrine, kidney, heart, and liver conditions. As of June 4, 2021, the Food & Drug Administration has approved semaglutide injections (2.4mg once weekly) for chronic weight management in adults with obesity and at least one weight-related condition. Some conditions that may qualify you for semaglutide treatments include:

  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
 Wilmington Top Weight Loss Specialist Edgemoor, DE
Weight Loss Clinic Edgemoor, DE

What Happens if You Stop Taking Semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE?

Weight loss medications, like semaglutide, may lead to the regaining of lost weight once the treatment is discontinued. In a clinical trial published in Practice Update, it was found that participants had regained 11.6% of the body weight they had lost during treatment after a year of stopping semaglutide medication and lifestyle intervention.

The researchers believe that this weight rebound may be due to the reversal of the cardiovascular benefits of semaglutide treatment, such as regular blood sugar levels and blood pressure. This highlights the need for maintenance medication and ongoing treatment for obesity as a chronic health condition to safely overcome its effects on quality of life and heart health.

The bottom line is that since semaglutide is a hormone-based treatment, it's best to take it on a regular basis over a period of time for the best results. That length of time will vary from patient to patient and depends on factors such as:

  • The Weight You're Starting At
  • Your Long-Term Goals for Weight Loss
  • How Your Body Responds to Semaglutide Injections

3 Ways to Boost the Effects of Semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE

If you've been struggling with your weight for a long time, chances are you're ready to shed that weight as soon as possible. While semaglutide can certainly help, there are a few different ways to extend the effects of semaglutide therapy.

Curious whether you qualify for adding additional peptides to your personalized weight loss plan? Contact Kennedy Health today to speak with one of our specialists. It would be our pleasure to hear more about your goals and give you more info on the powerful benefits of peptide therapy for weight loss.

 Semaglutide Edgemoor, DE

Stick to a Healthy Diet

For successful weight loss, it is important to adhere to a diet that restricts calorie intake by avoiding foods high in fats and carbohydrates, while still providing the body with necessary nutrients and protein. When crafting your diet, try to eat healthy foods and drinks such as:

  • Lots and Lots of Water
  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Lean Proteins
  • Low Carbohydrate Foods

When you call Kennedy Health to learn more about semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE, be sure to enquire about healthy eating and weight loss plans tailored to your body and goals.

 Weight Begins At Kennedy Health Edgemoor, DE

Exercise Often

To lose weight, it is essential to consume just the right number of calories that the body needs and not exceed it. Once this is achieved, physical activity such as cardio and strength training can help to burn excess fat and strengthen muscles.

If you're struggling to get into an exercise routine to help you lose weight faster, start small and work your way up. Instead of sprinting down your street, go for a 45-minute casual walk around your neighborhood. With time, you can increase the amount of time you're walking and the briskness with which you walk. Eventually, you can work your way up to jogging and other more rigorous exercises, so long as they're suitable for your body.

 Wilmington Top Weight Loss Specialist Edgemoor, DE

Ask About Other Peptides from Kennedy Health

Kennedy Health sets itself apart from other weight loss and wellness clinics by offering a wide range of innovative supplements and medicines, as opposed to the typical one-size-fits-all weight loss plans. If you're accustomed to fad diets and fast weight loss solutions, you may be unfamiliar with peptides that can supplement semaglutide treatment. Some of those may include:

  • AOD 9604
  • CJC 1295
  • Ipamorelin
  • MIC Injections
  • 7-Keto DHEA
  • Phentermine

Here's How to Eat Healthy While Using Semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE

At Kennedy Health, our medical weight loss experts understand that sustainable weight loss isn't solely dependent on medication. Rather, it requires a combination of healthy eating habits, exercise, and lifestyle choices. For those seeking to enhance their weight loss journey, peptides like semaglutide can be beneficial. However, individuals often struggle with adhering to a healthy diet. If you're planning to undergo semaglutide treatment, remember these tips.

Be Mindful While You Eat

Mindful

To practice mindful eating, you need to be fully attentive and engaged while having meals. This means savoring the taste of your food, being conscious of your body's hunger and satiety cues, and steering clear of any distractions like gadgets or TV. By taking your time to eat, your body will feel fuller, and you won't feel big, bloated, or uncomfortable.

Try Eating More Whole Foods

Eating

One way to improve your eating habits is by focusing on incorporating whole foods into your diet. As mentioned above, this includes foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats. These types of foods are packed with important nutrients that can help you feel full and satisfied, while also supporting your overall health and well-being.

Stay Hydrated Throughout the Day

Hydrated

Staying healthy and losing weight requires drinking ample amounts of water. Experts suggest drinking 8-10 cups of water each day. To add some variety, consider incorporating low-calorie beverages such as herbal tea or infused water.

Try Meal Prep Planning

Meal

To maintain a healthy diet, it's a good idea to plan your meals ahead of time. Take some time each week to plan out what you'll be eating and snacking on, making sure to include a mix of protein, complex carbohydrates, and healthy fats. This will help you avoid making impulsive food choices and ensure that you always have nutritious options available when you're feeling hungry.

Tips and Tricks to Simplify Healthy Eating

If you're considering semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE, you should also be thinking about cleaning up your diet to get the best weight loss results possible. There are numerous ways to modify your diet, but not every method will be effective for you, as everyone's needs and reactions to different food groups vary. The key to achieving positive changes in your diet is experimentation. Determine what works for you and what you can consistently incorporate into your daily routine.

 Semaglutide Edgemoor, DE

Don't make things too complicated. The most important aspect of making a healthy diet change is to ensure that you can stick to it. Start by taking a simple approach and search for methods to make implementing changes easier for your lifestyle. There are plenty of resources available to assist with dietary modifications.

Here are just a few tips and tricks to help make healthy eating realistic for you:

  • Rather than eliminating foods, consider replacing them with healthier options.
  • Search for nutritious meal ideas online. There are countless recipes and ways to create yummy yet healthy meals on the internet. Use it to your advantage.
  • Stay hydrated and satisfied by drinking plenty of water. The more water you drink, the better you'll feel, within reason.
  • Take small, gradual steps to avoid feeling overwhelmed and to maintain consistency.
  • Start your day with breakfast to kickstart your metabolism and encourage healthy eating choices and habits.

It's important to keep in mind that everyone's weight loss and management journey is different and may involve a lot of trial and error. To figure out what works best for you in reaching your goals, make changes slowly and focus on one variable at a time. This way, you can identify which changes are effective and which ones may not be helpful. And always remember to rely on your primary care physician or weight loss specialist. At Kennedy Health, our semaglutide experts and weight loss professionals can help craft a customized weight loss and dieting plan that works for your body, not someone with your age and weight.

Life at a Healthier Weight Begins at Kennedy Health

 Weight Begins At Kennedy Health Edgemoor, DE

Are you looking to achieve a healthy weight and lead a productive life? Do you want to make a positive impact on yourself and your loved ones? Take the first step towards wellness by reaching out to Kennedy Health. We will work with you to understand your weight-loss needs while providing innovative strategies and therapies like semaglutide in Edgemoor, DE, to help you keep that hard-to-lose weight off for good.

Latest News in Edgemoor, DE

Edgemoor container port gets $50M fed grant

WILMINGTON – The Port of Wilmington received a significant boost Friday when it was selected for a $50 million federal grant to support upgrades and the build-out of the future Edgemoor container port.The funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration’s Port Infrastructure Development Program (PIDP) comes on the heels of the state’s switch of operators at the port...

WILMINGTON – The Port of Wilmington received a significant boost Friday when it was selected for a $50 million federal grant to support upgrades and the build-out of the future Edgemoor container port.

The funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration’s Port Infrastructure Development Program (PIDP) comes on the heels of the state’s switch of operators at the port after progress on Edgemoor had not materialized.

Boston-based Enstructure was selected by the state-appointed Diamond State Port Corporation to take over the Port of Wilmington’s operations from Emirati company Gulftainer, which had fallen on financial difficulties and failed to make investments at the former Chemours titanium dioxide production campus along the Delaware River that state officials have targeted for a new deepwater port.

In obtaining a long-term lease for the Port of Wilmington, Enstructure agreed to invest $21.5 million to move the 100-acre Edgemoor project ahead and include its adjacent 25-acre, waterfront parcel that is currently home to its Port Contractors Inc. subsidiary to the port plans, increasing the project’s shoreline by about 45% and its total acreage by 30%.

Gov. John Carney has likewise committed $50 million from the state’s American Rescue Plan Act funds to advance Edgemoor.

Combined with the PIDP funds approved Friday, it means that Edgemoor now has more than $120 million committed to get the project moving, but it will likely need to identify further funding support. Gulftainer’s original cost estimate for the project was $500 million.

“This [PIDP grant] is a significant critical federal investment that will help to modernize and upgrade our existing port and to help build a new state-of-the-art container port on the river in Edgemoor,” U.S. Sen. Chris Coons, who had lobbied the Biden administration on behalf of the project, told Delaware Business Times. “This is something our business community has wanted for years. The first meeting I was in about modernizing and expanding the port I was county executive – that’s how long it’s been.”

The Port of Wilmington had unsuccessfully applied for funding from the PIDP at least twice in the past, Coons said, but the combination of new operational leadership, local investment and a smaller funding request than prior cycles likely helped it succeed now.

The investment is expected to spur upward of 1,000 new high-skilled, high-wage union jobs at the existing and future port, Coons said. It also will help to electrify cranes and vehicles on the port to reduce its carbon footprint, while implementing new gates and security features to protect the assets on the facility.

“This is putting Delaware on the map as a shipping receiver and sender in the region,” said Jim Maravelias, president of the Delaware State AFL-CIO that includes the International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA), in a statement. “The expansion will create well-paying jobs for generations to come, and this monetary boost is exactly what Delaware needs at this moment in time.”

Having met with senior leadership from Enstructure, Coons said that he has been impressed with the new operators to date.

“Enstructure strikes me as a much more grounded team that has a great deal of experience in ports of our size and our particular market share,” he said, noting that he was hopeful for Gulftainer’s success, but thought it didn’t have the same experience for a smaller port.

The grant comes as part of a PIDP package of more than $172.8 million for 26 small ports across the country to improve and expand their capacity to move freight reliably and efficiently, thereby boosting local and regional economies while protecting surrounding communities from air pollution.

“Everything from the food we eat to the cars we drive to the lumber and steel used to build our homes passes through America’s ports, making them some of the most critical links in our nation’s supply chain,” U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg said in a statement announcing the grant. “These investments will help expand capacity and speed up the movement of goods through our ports, contributing to cleaner air and more good-paying jobs as we go.”

Investigation: Questions about 10,000 tons of tires dumped on Delaware state-owned land

EDGEMOOR, Delaware (WPVI) -- A group of Delaware residents is concerned about an illegal tire dump on state-owned land.And it's no little dump, by some estimates, it's 10,000 tons of scrap tires.Residents say the mountains of old and shredded tires are an environmental hazard and a breeding ground for mosquitos.The state ordered the tires to be removed from the site in Edgemoor, Delaware, a year ago, but they still remain."So I was immediately alarmed at the size and the potential impacts," said resident...

EDGEMOOR, Delaware (WPVI) -- A group of Delaware residents is concerned about an illegal tire dump on state-owned land.

And it's no little dump, by some estimates, it's 10,000 tons of scrap tires.

Residents say the mountains of old and shredded tires are an environmental hazard and a breeding ground for mosquitos.

The state ordered the tires to be removed from the site in Edgemoor, Delaware, a year ago, but they still remain.

"So I was immediately alarmed at the size and the potential impacts," said resident Simeon Hahn.

Residents, including Hahn and Jeff Richardson, first saw the images earlier this year.

"If they catch on fire, which has happened before, with tire piles, that's a major, major problem," noted Hahn.

"This is a very glaring example of a massive breakdown in the enforcement of regulations," added Richardson.

The two blame state officials for allowing it. They want to know how it happened and when it'll be cleaned up.

"There's almost like a wall of silence," said Richardson.

The site is part of the Port of Wilmington and is owned by the state. In 2018 the state entity that ran it, the Diamond State Port Corporation, leased the property to a company called Gulftainer which is based in the Middle East.

The company said at the time it would invest nearly $600 million to redevelop the port and build a new container terminal on the site. It was hailed to bring thousands of jobs.

"So far, we got a bunch of tires on the site," said Hahn.

In late 2021, the state fire marshal was alerted to the tire dump.

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) issued a Cease and Desist order in June of last year, citing Gulftainer and a Bronx-based company S&A Marketing, which incorporation records say deals in chemicals and allied products.

The order states neither company had a permit to store the used tires and ordered them to issue a cleanup plan.

Once approved, cleanup was ordered and completed within 60 days.

Attempts by the Investigative Team to reach S&A Marketing were unsuccessful.

Gulftainer had no comment.

"Do you think the state has been a poor landlord here?" asked Action News' Chad Pradelli.

"Very much so," replied Hahn.

DNREC told Action News neither company complies. The order calls for fines of $400 a day.

The Diamond State Port Corporation, whose Chairman is DE Secretary of State, Jeffrey Bullock, wouldn't answer most of our questions and instead released the following statement:

"The Diamond State Port Corporation has made it clear to Gulftainer that the scrap tires at Edgemoor should be removed immediately by the responsible party. Gulftainer has gone to court to get legal possession of the tires and has advised the DSPC that it has a plan. We have asked for that plan in writing and for the plan to be executed promptly."

"They didn't come here overnight," said Hahn. "And they're not going to be gone overnight."

An audit of the Port Corporation last year showed Gulftainer behind on its lease payments by more than $4 million.

We tried to get a current figure but the state agency wouldn't provide it, and we voiced our concerns about transparency.

Residents are now concerned taxpayers could be stuck footing the bill for the cleanup.

Future unclear for sometimes-troubled Edge Moor site

State Coastal Zone Act rules are likely to squash any attempt to develop new heavy industry at Chemours’ soon-to-close Edge Moor pigment plant, but state and county officials say they hope a new manufacturer or other employer will consider the site.It was the closest state and county officials came Thursday to a prediction for the 115-acre property, acquired by DuPont in 1935 and a one-time flagship of the company’s titanium dioxide pigment division.Edge Moor was among the few heavy industries allowed...

State Coastal Zone Act rules are likely to squash any attempt to develop new heavy industry at Chemours’ soon-to-close Edge Moor pigment plant, but state and county officials say they hope a new manufacturer or other employer will consider the site.

It was the closest state and county officials came Thursday to a prediction for the 115-acre property, acquired by DuPont in 1935 and a one-time flagship of the company’s titanium dioxide pigment division.

Edge Moor was among the few heavy industries allowed to remain in operation when lawmakers passed the Coastal Zone law in mid-1971 and banned new heavy industries from a 275,000-acre buffer along the Delaware River, Delaware Bay and Atlantic Coast.

In closing, Edge Moor leaves behind a tract with ample access to Norfolk Southern’s rail network, good highway access, a substantial natural gas pipeline supply and a location along a stretch of river where the newly deepened main shipping channel passes closest to any part of the state.

“I don’t know if we should be thinking beyond industrial,” Delaware Economic Development Office Director Bernice Whaley said. “Industrial sites don’t come around very often.”

“It is less likely that it will have another use besides industrial because of the businesses around it,” Whaley said.

Environmental baggage also will remain behind, however, including ongoing state- and federally supervised assessments of soil and groundwater pollution from decades of operations; an offshore wastewater discharge that at times sent low levels of polychlorinated biphenyls into the river; filled-in wastewater impoundments; and at least one landfill currently being managed under close-to hazardous waste standards.

“Right now it’s a grandfathered heavy industry,” said Phil Cherry, program manager with Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. “If they want to continue making titanium dioxide under a new name or sell it to somebody for that, it would be permissible.

“It’s not likely a new heavy industry could be permitted there,” Cherry said. “Manufacturing might still be a possibility.”

Cherry and others said they had no warning before Chemours, recently spun off from DuPont, announced that it would shut down Edge Moor in a matter of weeks.

“From an employment standpoint, this is another devastating blow for the communities I represent,” said New Castle County Councilman John Cartier.

Cartier’s northeasternmost district along and near the Delaware River has suffered a slow, steady loss of industrial employers, including the shutdown of the Evraz Claymont Steel plant and the nearby Sunoco Refinery in Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania.

“It’s the whole industrial base – the Claymont industrial sector and more,” said Cartier, who recalled buying his first Delaware home from an Edge Moor plant worker after moving to the state in 1971. “You’re just seeing it leaving the area and closing down. The value of that is going to go away, and it’s going to have a negative impact.”

“It’s a challenge – re-inventing the old places and old sites.”

Although the plant has natural gas pipeline service and is near Calpine’s big Hay Road generating complex, Cherry said it was unlikely that it would be considered for a new power plant.

“It’s a great industrial site. It’s also in the industrial area along the river. It would be nice to see it put back into some sort of productive use with the associated jobs, but we don’t know what the plans are.”

Whaley said she met with Chemours officials on Thursday afternoon.

“After this meeting, I’m totally convinced Chemours is working with us to ensure the best use for the site. They are very conscious about what this means for the state of Delaware,” Whaley said.

Cartier acknowledged that some in his district will have mixed feelings about the plant shutdown.

Edge Moor ranked among Delaware’s gravest worries in state and federal risk management planning for Bhopal-type toxic and hazardous releases from industrial sites. The company’s production process required millions of pounds of chlorine to heat and process with titanium dioxide ore, under conditions that could also create unwanted and highly toxic byproducts. Part of the processing involved creation of titanium tetrachloride, another hazardous and volatile chemical.

Before federal Homeland Security officials clamped down on public release of “worst-case” risk scenarios, Edge Moor was publicly rated as a particular hazard.

Company managers said their worst-case would be the sudden release of a 90-ton chlorine tank or tank car. In that case, a plume of deadly or harmful vapors could drift for miles off-site before dissipating, officials have said, exposing tens of thousands to injury.

While Edge Moor provided good jobs and a wide range of community support, “the plant presented a kind of environmental issue for the community,” Cartier said.

“We had a lot of chlorine there that was used in the process, which is very hazardous. There were always issues of public safety with the handling of materials over there. The site itself, I’m sure, is going to have issues in terms of environmental contamination.”

Whaley said company officials “feel very strongly that they are in good shape environmentally. They really believe any issues have been taken care of.”

State and federal officials have been working with Edge Moor’s management for years, conducting investigations of pollution risks and cleanup needs at the site. At one point, Edge Moor ranked among the largest producers of unintended and unwanted, toxic dioxin compounds and other contaminants in the nation and world.

Dioxin is a long-lived, toxic substance associated with the military defoliant Agent Orange, among other connections.

DuPont and the Environmental Protection Agency discovered in the late 1990s that the company’s process was generating relatively huge amounts of dioxins. Much was caught up in a byproduct that the company at one point hoped to sell for use in water treatment.

Through much of the first half of the last decade, state and federal officials and local residents debated calls to clean up the site and haul away huge amounts of the waste – a solution that DuPont said could cost $380 million. Officials later settled on a $5 million plan to landfill the material near the Delaware River, under a cap and with long-term monitoring.

DuPont also agreed to spend millions more on cleanups at 27 locations around the plant, including old spill sites, wastewater treatment lagoons, drainage systems, underground tanks and other areas that DNREC officials believe might contain toxic polychlorinated biphenyls, heavy metals and dioxin.

Whaley said DEDO plans to market the availability of Chemours’ property on the state agency’s web site. She said an similar advertisement for a location in Sussex County generated some interest.

Contact Jeff Montgomery at (302) 463-3344 or [email protected].

What you need to know about Port of Wilmington. Who runs it, and why it's in trouble

After years of financial turmoil, the operator of the Port of Wilmington on Monday created a new leadership team composed of two corporate restructuring experts and a former cabinet member to Gov. John Carney.The state of the port today comes in stark contrast to the vision Emirati port operator Gulftainer pitched before taking over operations in 2018. Then, Gulftainer officials said they could transform the Port of Wilmington into one of the East Coast's largest gateways and potentially double the number of jobs at the...

After years of financial turmoil, the operator of the Port of Wilmington on Monday created a new leadership team composed of two corporate restructuring experts and a former cabinet member to Gov. John Carney.

The state of the port today comes in stark contrast to the vision Emirati port operator Gulftainer pitched before taking over operations in 2018. Then, Gulftainer officials said they could transform the Port of Wilmington into one of the East Coast's largest gateways and potentially double the number of jobs at the port.

Four years later, the port operator owes Delaware at least $3 million, a promised new facility has yet to be built and the state is still subsidizing some port operations.

RECENT REPORTING:Port operator's financial issues prompt board changes, pushback from key supporter

Why did Delaware privatize the Port of Wilmington?

Carney in September 2018 said the deal to privatize the Port of Wilmington would secure and grow the state's 5,700 port and maritime-related jobs and halt the loss of "blue-collar jobs" in the state. The state of Delaware had been operating the port at an annual loss of $10 million in the years prior.

Delaware was "out of the business of subsidizing the port," Carney said.

Who is Gulftainer?

Gulftainer is a privately owned independent port operator based in the United Arab Emirates.

Founded in 1976, it operates two U.S. ports: the Port of Wilmington and Port Canaveral in Florida. It also has ports in Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

Gulftainer is the parent company of GT USA Wilmington, which operates the port.

What was in the agreement with Gulftainer?

The state and Gulftainer negotiated a 50-year lease beginning in 2018.

Among the terms set in a 150-page agreement between Delaware and Gulftainer subsidiary GT USA Wilmington are that "there shall be no continuing financial commitment" from Delaware; that the port shall never be used as a liquefied natural gas terminal; and that GT USA invest $585 million into Port of Wilmington infrastructure, mostly for construction of a massive new container terminal. The terminal is supposed to be constructed at Edgemoor, a former DuPont chemical site north of Wilmington along the Delaware River.

GT USA is required to pay Delaware at least $3 million each year to operate the port.

PORT DISPUTES: After Port of Wilmington blocked Wawa trucks, judge rules against port operator in lawsuit

What moves through the port? How large is it?

At the time the state privatized the port, it was moving about 7 million tons of goods each year, about a quarter of which were bananas and plantains. The port's throughput was slightly larger than that of its competitors in South Jersey, but smaller than that of the Port of Philadelphia.

When did the port operator begin to struggle?

Gulftainer executive Peter Richards in late August 2021 told employees, "We're actually running a port for three years now, running a port for three years and losing money all of the time."

PREVIOUS REPORTING: After years of losses, can Gulftainer deliver on Port of Wilmington promises?

His comments followed more than a year of observable turmoil at the port, featuring the departure of key finance executives, lawsuits, threats of a work stoppage following delayed paychecks, and claims by one Delaware state senator that "all of the contractors on site" were not being paid.

Is Delaware still subsidizing the port?

The state has committed multiple recent subsidies.

The Bond Bill included a $5 million appropriation for a "Port Terminal Access and Training Facility."

The Diamond State Port Corporation, a state entity that ran the port before its 2018 privatization and now oversees GT USA Wilmington’s operations, committed nearly $3 million in April to pay the costs of a settlement that resolved a dispute between GT USA Wilmington and a union health insurance fund.

Officials at the corporation also approved what could become $20 million more for expenses related to obtaining and defending permits for construction of the container terminal at Edgemoor.

Earlier this year, GT USA Wilmington failed to make its first quarter lease payment to the state – a delinquent amount to taxpayers that totals at least $750,000. It has not made subsequent payment to Delaware since, Secretary of State Jeffrey Bullock said last month.

State representative Debra Heffernan in a letter to Carney and Bullock Monday said GT USA has not made a lease payment in more than a year – indicating a delinquent amount to taxpayers of at least $3 million. Heffernan said despite the "breach of contract," Delaware has continued "to contribute financially to the port in ways that appear to conflict with the terms of the original lease agreement."

Who else does GT USA Wilmington owe money?

As state officials negotiated the lease with Gulftainer in early 2018, they pressured Gulftainer and Murphy Marine Services – a local ship loading company already doing business at the port – to combine operations, according to court documents.

The companies agreed to combine operations, but couldn't agree on a price that Gulftainer subsidiary GT USA Wilmington should pay to take over the smaller Murphy Marine.

PREVIOUS REPORTING: What a $28M ruling from a Delaware judge means for the Port of Wilmington and its future

Murphy Marine wanted roughly $26 million, but Gulftainer officials saw the company as far less valuable. The dispute landed in Chancery Court where a judge ruled last month that GT USA Wilmington must pay Murphy Marine Services more than $28 million – a $21.5 million payment plus interest.

Why did GT USA Wilmington form a new leadership team?

GT USA Wilmington created a new leadership team with a board of directors now composed of two corporate restructuring experts and one former cabinet member to Carney. No one from the Gulftainer team that sold its privatization bid to Delaware officials in 2018 is on the board.

GT USA Wilmington said in a statement Wednesday that it reconfigured its board as “a part of the further development of the Port.”

When asked Tuesday about the new board of directors, Secretary of State Jeff Bullock said GT USA’s creditors – to which it owes $100 million – “exercised their ability under a lending agreement to name an independent board with the goals of expanding growth” at the Port of Wilmington.

The board restructuring came less than a month after a judge directed GT USA Wilmington to pay more than $28 million to a ship loading company that previously operated at the port.

The new board includes Tim Pohl and Michael Sullivan – each corporate restructuring consultants – and Mike Jackson, who served as director of the Delaware Office of Management and Budget between 2017 and 2020.

$580 million Wilmington port takeover could add over 5,000 jobs

International port operator Gulftainer wants to invest $574 million to retool the existing Port of Wilmington and build a new container terminal on the Delaware River at Edgemoor, Peter Richards, CEO of the company, said in an interview.Secretary of State Jeffrey Bullock said an agreement for the company to take over the existing Port of Wilmington could double the estimated 5,700 port-related jobs in Delaware. The past decade has seen Delaware hemorrhage blue-collar jobs and state officials see Gulftainer's proposal as...

International port operator Gulftainer wants to invest $574 million to retool the existing Port of Wilmington and build a new container terminal on the Delaware River at Edgemoor, Peter Richards, CEO of the company, said in an interview.

Secretary of State Jeffrey Bullock said an agreement for the company to take over the existing Port of Wilmington could double the estimated 5,700 port-related jobs in Delaware. The past decade has seen Delaware hemorrhage blue-collar jobs and state officials see Gulftainer's proposal as a relief.

"This is a really big deal," Governor John Carney said.

Gulftainer is based in the United Arab Emirates and operates 15 ports around the world. The company opened its first terminal in the U.S. in southern Florida in 2015 and is a subsidiary of Crescent Enterprises, a privately held conglomerate.

"We see Wilmington and the Delaware River as the future and a major gateway import and export to the east coast of the United States," Richards said.

Under the terms of the pending 50-year agreement, the company will take over operations at the Port of Wilmington at the confluence of the Christina and Delaware rivers. The port is currently operated by the semi-public Diamond State Port Corp.

The deal also calls for development of a new container facility on state-owned land that was home to DuPont Co.'s Edge Moor chemical production facility – and 200 jobs – before it was shuttered in 2015.

Construction of a new container terminal on that property is to begin by 2022. Richards said his company will invest some $400 million in the facility. The state bought the 114-acre property from Chemours for $10 million in 2016.

Preliminary plans call for a 2,000-foot berth built on the Delaware River to be serviced by eight of the largest cranes on the river, Richards said. The terminal will be able to unload larger ships than the existing port which is on the shallower Christina River.

Richards said Gulftainer also seeks to invest millions in the existing Port of Wilmington.

Currently, the state spends about $15 million a year subsidizing operating losses and capital expenses at the facility, which needs more than $100 million in investment to stay competitive in the coming decades, according to a study commissioned by the port's operating board.

Richards said his company will be able to make the necessary investments to satisfy the port's current major customers, which primarily import fresh fruit and juice from Central and South America.

Those customers, Dole and Chiquita primarily, are moving toward greater reliance on containerized shipping, which is a third of the port's current tonnage.

The proposed agreement between Gulftainer and the state calls for $73 million in investment in the existing port through the next decade. Richards said the investment will allow the facility more efficiently handle containers.

"We can't afford to sit still (at the current facility)," Richards said. "It is losing money and the investment has not been there to do the modernization it needs."

Richards said his company has spoken to the port's major customers and in response is planning to spend $85 million to build a cold storage distribution and fumigation center on the Edgemoor property.

The agreement sets benchmarks for traffic growth in and out of Delaware. The port now moves about 375,000 TEUs – or the equivalent of 200,000 20-foot-long shipping containers – each year. The goal is to double that in 10 years, Bullock said.

Such growth would see Wilmington surpass the current 500,000 TEU annual container traffic at the Port of Philadelphia about two hours upriver. Investments in that facility have targeted doubling its container traffic in the same period.

The agreement calls for a 75 percent increase in traffic for non-containerized goods like liquids and automobiles.

Dennis Rochford, president of the Maritime Exchange for the Delaware River and Bay, said Pennsylvania and New Jersey have committed hundreds of millions of dollars in Delaware River ports.

This is largely being driven by the dredging of the Delaware River as well as aging infrastructure on the river's ports. He said it is necessary to protect business from going to larger East Coast ports.

Richards said his company has business agreements with 19 of the top 20 shipping lines in the world. He said leveraging that will grow the local business and he sees "huge potential" for food exports to Europe and West Africa.

"We are already working their vessels and working their customers at our facilities around the globe," Richards said. "That gives me a tremendous marketing advantage."

Under the proposed partnership, the state would become more of a landlord, initially receiving annual payments from Gulftainer of $6 million, according to Secretary of State Jeffrey Bullock. The state would also receive royalties based on the quantity of goods moving through the port.

Bullock and Richards said there is no expectation for the state to aid in the planned capital investments. As a matter of policy, Carney said it is important for the state to get largely out of the port business.

"The state has been subsidizing the port since we have been the owner," Carney said. "This agreement enables the state to get out of the business of subsidizing the port. That is the business model up an down the river."

Richards said such a long-term partnership would also see his company play some role in the establishment of a maritime technology training college in Delaware.

"We are giving our lives to this," he said.

Some members of the General Assembly have expressed skepticism about how the company will deal with the local union labor. The agreement stipulates that the company must keep unionized labor at its facilities at least at its current level, Bullock said.

The state was in a similar position with a proposed agreement to turn the port over to Kinder Morgan in 2013 only to have the deal scuttled after pressure from local labor. International Longshoremen's Union Local 1694 President William Ashe indicated this situation is different.

"We are happy with the proposal and everything that is in it," Ashe said. "If we don't do something, we are going to lose what we have."

Gulftainer was chosen after the state solicited requests for proposals. Bullock said the state received about 10 proposals and winnowed the choices down with the help of a selection committee comprised of members of the port's operating board.

The proposed agreement will be debated at the April 6 meeting of the port's governing board. Bullock said he expects legislators to debate the agreement in the weeks after.

State Sen. Harris McDowell, D-Wilmington, said he was briefed by Richards on the proposal briefly last week. He said he was optimistic about the potential but said there needs to be a thorough process once the agreement is put to the General Assembly.

He said he needs to see more detail on how the company will drive growth, protect union labor and specifics on how the deal is structured.

"We will have to rely on the expertise of those who put the deal together if we can't develop our own sources of expertise," McDowell said. "I think we have a deeper responsibility than that."

Rich Heffron, president of the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce, said Delaware is playing catch up with ports upriver but called Gulftainer's interest "positive."

"If you are going to bring in more ships and bring in more cargo you are going to bring in more jobs," Heffron said.

Contact Xerxes Wilson at (302) 324-2787 or [email protected]. Follow @Ber_Xerxes on Twitter.

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