Knee Pain Treatment in Brandywine, DE

Non-Surgical Knee Pain and Arthritis Specialists in Brandywine, DE

Our knees are incredible structures that withstand a lot of pressure and strain from everyday activities like running, jumping, and walking. Unfortunately, inflammation and injury can happen if we overwork or misuse these joints. Even with the best care, osteoarthritis can develop, causing knee pain. While some people turn to surgery or medication for quick relief, this approach can be counterproductive. Have you ever thought about how painful and long recovery can be when you undergo a knee replacement?

At Kennedy Health, we believe there are better options for solving your knee pain - not temporarily, but for years to come. Unlike other providers, our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Brandywine, DE, focus on finding and solving the root cause of your knee pain. That way, we can provide more comprehensive and long-lasting relief to our patients.

Regenerative medicine for knee pain is both a safe and effective option to consider, especially if you're wary about the pitfalls of knee replacement surgery or powerful pain medications. What types of knee pain and conditions can regenerative medicine from Kennedy Health solve? Our range of cutting-edge treatments can address a number of musculoskeletal issues, including:

  • ACL Tears
  • MCL Tears
  • Arthritis
  • Tendonitis
  • Ligament Inflammation
  • Tendon Inflammation
  • Knee Tears
  • More

If you have been searching high and low for a knee pain clinic offering natural healing, tissue regeneration, and improved quality of life, our knee pain specialists are here to help.

Service Areas

The Knee Pain and

Arthritis Specialists in Brandywine, DE You Can Trust

As we age, the wear and tear on our muscles and joints can cause discomfort and pain. While it's true that some people believe that these aches and pains are an inevitable part of aging, many knee pain doctors challenge this assumption. At Kennedy Health, our team of arthritis and knee pain specialists aims to provide natural therapies that activate your body's innate ability to heal and renew its tissues. Rather than relying on harmful surgeries and sketchy pain medicines, we're laser-focused on harnessing this remarkable power so that you have a viable alternative to going under the knife.

Joints-Bone

While surgery may be necessary in some cases, it's essential to recognize that it's not always the best solution for every type of pain. Our non-surgical knee pain treatments have proven to be highly effective in resolving discomfort and restoring mobility for many of our patients. During your consultation with us, our experienced team will evaluate your current condition and needs with sensitivity and care.

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We understand the impact that pain can have on your life and are committed to providing the most effective and appropriate knee pain treatment for your unique situation. If surgery is the best option for you, we will offer our professional advice and guidance to help you make an informed decision. However, if our regenerative knee pain therapy is a viable alternative, we will take the time to discuss your options in detail and work with you to design a personalized treatment plan that meets your specific needs.

Drug
Non-Surgical Knee Pain Brandywine, DE

Is Knee Replacement Surgery Your Best Option?

Picture this: After trying medication and cortisone injections to no avail, your physician has suggested surgery as the only remaining option for your excruciating knee pain. Though surgery is a daunting prospect due to the potential risks and lengthy recovery time, you trust that your doctor has your best interests at heart.

But is a knee replacement really the best choice for long-lasting relief from pain? At Kennedy Health, our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Brandywine, DE believe there's a better way.

How Does Regenerative Medicine Help Chronic Knee Pain?

The natural ability of the human body to heal itself is truly remarkable. From repairing broken bones to sealing cuts and fighting off infections, the body is equipped with powerful healing mechanisms. But in cases of severe injury or illness, regenerative medicine may provide a viable solution. By utilizing cutting-edge techniques such as cell therapy, bioengineering, and gene therapy, regenerative medicine aims to enhance the body's own healing capabilities.

Regenerative therapies are seen as the future of medicine, representing a shift away from traditional medical interventions. They hold tremendous promise for treating chronic conditions like osteoarthritis, as well as more serious diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's. As the field of regenerative medicine continues to evolve, new treatments are constantly emerging, rendering older methods obsolete.

For instance, microfracture procedures, which were once used to treat cartilage defects leading to arthritis, are no longer favored in the US. Instead, knee pain and arthritis specialists in Brandywine, DE prefer regenerative knee pain treatments like platelet-rich plasma therapy, which has proven to be highly effective for chronic knee pain sufferers.

Can Regenerative Medicine Really Help You Avoid Knee Replacement Surgery?

At Kennedy Health, we receive inquiries almost every day from folks just like you who have been fighting through chronic knee pain. They come to us excited about - yet still unsure of - regenerative medicine for their knees. They wonder whether or not these treatments are truly effective. Fortunately, by providing them with a custom recovery plan tailored to their body, we can show them it works, not just tell them.

As a popular new form of treatment, many studies have been conducted into the efficacy of treatments such as PRP, prolotherapy, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, and more. In fact, regenerative medical therapies are actively being pursued by renowned institutions like Harvard and the Mayo Clinic. The NIH recognizes that regenerative medicine is a highly promising treatment option for addressing knee pain and other diseases.

Additionally, the FDA maintains high efficacy and safety standards by overseeing various regenerative medicines, while organizations such as the AATB focus on ethical considerations in the advancement of regenerative medical therapies.

If you've been looking everywhere for a knee pain relief clinic but keep failing to find a solution tailored to your body, regenerative therapy may be the answer. Our patients report real relief from knee pain without suffering through issues common to knee replacements, such as:

  • Unneeded Complications
  • Long and Painful Recovery Times
  • Prescription Pain Pills
  • Anesthesia
  • Unnecessary Scar Tissue and Knee Scarring
  • Expensive and Ineffective Surgery
 Kennedy Health Brandywine, DE

Who Benefits Most from Knee Pain and Arthritis Specialists in Brandywine, DE?

Regenerative medicines have been proven to help men and women with a wide range of common issues, from skin care needs to injury healing. When it comes to knee pain, regenerative therapies are becoming the go-to choice over knee replacements. If you're experiencing one or more of the following conditions, it may be time to see a knee pain and arthritis specialist from Kennedy Health.

 Knee Replacement Surgery Brandywine, DE
Knee Arthritis

Knee Arthritis

Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis can lead to knee pain, stiffness, and inflammation due to cartilage degeneration or autoimmune responses. In terms of common knee problems, arthritis is near the top of the list and can often be treated without needing a knee replacement or surgery.

Overuse

Repetitive Stress and Overuse

Repetitive movements or prolonged stress on the knee joint, such as running or jumping, can lead to chronic knee pain caused by conditions like patellofemoral pain syndrome or iliotibial band syndrome.

Tendonitis

Tendonitis

Inflammation of tendons, such as patellar or quadriceps tendonitis, can cause knee pain and difficulty with movement.

Injuries

Trauma and Injuries

Knee injuries, including ligament tears (ACL, MCL, or meniscus), fractures, dislocations, or strains, can cause acute pain and instability in the knee.

Ligaments

Torn Ligaments

Damage to the ACL, MCL, or other knee ligaments can lead to instability in the knee joint, discomfort, and challenges with weight-bearing tasks.

3 Reasons to Re-Think a Knee Replacement Surgery

If your doctor is saying that a knee replacement is the only option available to eliminate your knee pain, consider it a red flag. Before you go under the knife, consider these potential pitfalls:

Knee ReplacementSurgery Alternatives from Kennedy Health

Do you often experience joint pain that interferes with your daily activities and causes discomfort? Joint pain - especially in your knees - can be particularly debilitating, making it difficult to stand, sit, squat, or enjoy time with loved ones. While sports injuries often result in knee pain, most chronic issues stem from the gradual deterioration of tissue that supports your joints.

For example, the cartilage in your knee, which cushions your joints, can break down, causing bones to rub together, which leads to arthritis. Thankfully, non-surgical medical treatments for knee pain and arthritis have come a long way in the last two decades. At Kennedy Health, we offer a variety of regenerative alternatives to knee surgery that can provide long-term relief from tissue breakdown in your knees.

Here are just a few of the most popular treatment options provided by our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Brandywine, DE.

Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Knee Pain

PRP, which stands for platelet-rich plasma, is a special type of blood plasma that contains a higher concentration of platelets than usual. Platelets are blood cells that aid in the growth and healing of the body. For people experiencing knee joint pain, PRP injections may be beneficial in reducing inflammation and promoting healing.

First, one of our specialists extracts a small amount of blood from your body. That blood is placed in a centrifuge. The centrifuge then spins the blood, causing your platelets to separate from the red blood cells. This platelet-rich plasma is then injected into your knee. With time, your body's own healing mechanisms provide joint pain relief, which can help you avoid surgery.

 Heal Your Knees Brandywine, DE

Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy for Knee Pain

Shockwave therapy involves delivering high-energy sound waves to the affected areas of your knees, which can help stimulate healing, pain reduction, and tissue regeneration. Shockwave therapy can also be very helpful when it comes to restoring your overall knee functionality because it breaks down scar tissue and stimulates blood vessel growth, both of which are crucial for long-lasting relief.

 Kennedy Health Brandywine, DE

Laser Therapy for Knee Pain

Most folks don't think about lasers when it comes to treating their chronic knee pain. But in modern times, truth is often stranger than fiction. Unlike high-level laser treatment, laser therapy for knee pain directs light energy to the affected area without causing any damage to the skin. By sending a 30-second light pulse into the knee, the light energy effectively penetrates deep into the joint and triggers chemical changes that promote the healing and growth of damaged cells and tissues. Contact Kennedy Health today for more information on this remarkable regenerative treatment.

 Knee Replacement Surgery Brandywine, DE

Prolotherapy for Knee Pain

Regenerative injection therapy, or prolotherapy, is a medical procedure that aims to trigger your body's natural healing process by injecting a solution into the affected area of your knees. This exciting technique can help to strengthen your tendons, ligaments, and joints, which ultimately lessens your pain and improves your stability.

 Brandywine, DE

True Relief from Knee Pain Begins with Custom Treatment from Kennedy Health

Are you sick and tired of your knees holding you back from enjoying life to its fullest? Few things are as heartbreaking as not being able to enjoy activities with your kids, grandkids, and loved ones. If you're suffering from knee pain due to an injury, arthritis, or another condition, don't settle for a lifetime of pain or harmful surgery. Fight back with regenerative medicine from Kennedy Health.

Our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Brandywine, DE will conduct a thorough evaluation of your knees, including a review of your medical history and diagnostic tests to determine the best treatment for your specific type of pain.

Unlike some clinics, our team prioritizes personalized care and works closely with you to develop a comprehensive approach to managing your symptoms. It all starts by scheduling a consultation at our office. If you're ready to reclaim your active lifestyle, we're here to support you every step of the way.

Latest News in Brandywine, DE

DNREC’s Brandywine Zoo Welcomes Baby Crowned Lemur

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and Brandywine Zoo are excited to announce its newest addition, a baby Crowned lemur, which recently was welcomed into the zoo. The lemur baby was born to Sophie and Kipp, Crowned lemurs that came to and were paired at the Brandywine Zoo in October 2020 as part of an Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) ...

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and Brandywine Zoo are excited to announce its newest addition, a baby Crowned lemur, which recently was welcomed into the zoo. The lemur baby was born to Sophie and Kipp, Crowned lemurs that came to and were paired at the Brandywine Zoo in October 2020 as part of an Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP). This is the second SSP birth from a breeding pair at the zoo this summer – a Southern pudu fawn was welcomed in July.

The lemur baby born at the Brandywine Zoo is a significant contribution to the Crowned lemur population in North America. This birth brings the total number of Crowned lemurs in AZA institutions nationally to 35, which includes the Brandywine Zoo’s recent arrival as the only crowned lemur baby born this year. SSPs are conservation breeding programs where vulnerable species in human care are optimally matched for genetic diversity to increase the population. Kipp was born at the Duke Lemur Center in 2016, while Sophie was born at Zoo Atlanta in 2018.

Crowned lemurs are an endangered species and their population is in decline. They are threatened by deforestation and habitat loss caused by other land use conversion, such as charcoal production and mining for sapphires and gold; the illegal pet trade; and hunting for bushmeat.

The Brandywine Zoo is one of only 12 locations in North America where Crowned lemurs can be viewed by the public. Sophie and Kipp joined two other species of lemurs – the Black and White Ruffed and Ring-Tailed lemurs – and Radiated tortoises when the zoo’s Madagascar exhibit opened in 2020. That new exhibit is part of the Brandywine Zoo’s master plan, which focuses on improved animal welfare and guest experiences, species of conservation concern and the inclusion of more mixed species exhibits. In addition to the Madagascar habitat, the master plan includes the already-completed condor viewing area, honeybee display and play area, goat barnyard experience and Animal Care Center.

Sophie and her baby are not yet on exhibit at the zoo and won’t be for some time – probably into the fall. Staff are closely monitoring Sophie and her as yet unnamed infant and will be able to identify the newborn’s sex and weight once the infant is old enough to venture away from its mother.

A name for the baby lemur will be chosen soon. Check the Delaware State Parks and Brandywine Zoo Facebook pages for updates as the baby progresses.

The Brandywine Zoo is managed by the DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation with support by its non-profit partner, the Delaware Zoological Society (DZS). DZS supports the mission of the Brandywine Zoo and is raising funds for more upgrades to the zoo that include updated animal habitats, infrastructure, and guest services. For more information about or to donate to the Our Zoo-Re-imagined Capital Campaign, visit https://brandywinezoo.org/reimagined/ or email Mark Shafer, Delaware Zoological Society executive director, [email protected]

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, [email protected] or Michael Globetti, [email protected].

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Delaware’s first food scrap composting center to open in Brandywine. How to get involved

A quiet movement is taking place behind the Brandywine Library aiming to reform how Delawareans approach garbage.Nearly a quarter of all material in Delaware’s landfills is food waste, adding up to around 16,000 tons every year according to the Delaware Solid Waste Authority.In hopes of reducing this number, the local nonprofit Plastic Free Delaware set up the Delaware Community Composting Initiative. The group has been working for years to get the state’s first food scrap composting site approved and...

A quiet movement is taking place behind the Brandywine Library aiming to reform how Delawareans approach garbage.

Nearly a quarter of all material in Delaware’s landfills is food waste, adding up to around 16,000 tons every year according to the Delaware Solid Waste Authority.

In hopes of reducing this number, the local nonprofit Plastic Free Delaware set up the Delaware Community Composting Initiative. The group has been working for years to get the state’s first food scrap composting site approved and constructed.

At the new site set to open the first week of January, a limited number of community members will collectively compost food scraps and yard waste from their homes to turn them into usable soil.

What started as a passing thought from nearby residents and program director Brigid Gregory has turned into a full-on waste management and educational program aiming to spread its initiatives statewide.

Two and a half years after beginning the permitting process, the compost site for use by co-op members is nearly set to open at Talley Day Park, the first and largest of at least four sites projected to open soon.

How to get involved

To use the Talley Day composting site you must register with the Delaware Community program, and be willing to volunteer to maintain the site.

Volunteers must attend in-person training about the system and commit to 1.5 hours of on-site work per month or pay $47.50 per month. The labor involved at the site includes mixing the materials, taking and recording the temperature and weight of the piles and watering the materials for the reports being sent back to the county government and DNREC.

For the first few months, volunteers will only be allowed to have supervised visits while getting acclimated to the composting processes. After that, members will be able to visit the site any time the park is open.

Individuals who are interested in getting involved in the program can contact Brigid Gregory at [email protected].

What are those boxes behind the library?

If you’re taking a stroll around Talley Day Park, you might not look twice at it – which may be the point.

Gregory explained that the design and location of the center were chosen to be easy to access but not to take attention away from the nearby playgrounds, walking trails and dog parks. This way it may also prevent nearby parkgoers from using the bins for everyday garbage.

The community compost center is made up of six bins.

More:Amid protests and feuds, New Castle County rezoning will go to a council vote

Two attached bins are set aside for brown organic materials like sticks, brown leaves and wood chips which will be mixed with the food scraps. The other four attached bins are part of a four-month system, during which the scraps and organic material are broken down into usable compost.

As the only community food scrap composting site in the state, Plastic Free Delaware needs to remain in compliance with its permit’s standards or risk being shut down.

“The goal with community composting is that it’s accessible for people who don’t have backyards or have different abilities,” Gregory said. “There’s very high standards that we have to meet.”

They must send compost samples to the University of Delaware’s soil testing program to ensure its safety as a soil additive.

The cost of the site with its thermometers and scales was around $3,000. The group paid another $2,000 for the permitting process.

More:Pay early, save money: How Wilmington is working to address its parking woes, complaints

Spreading the word

Currently, the only community compost centers in Delaware are attached to community gardens, which are technically not allowed to accept food waste.

Plastic Free Delaware’s community composting program is working with others interested in obtaining a permit for additional sites to compost food scraps.

Good compost takes anywhere from six months to a year to fully form. After the samples are tested and approved by the University of Delaware’s soil testing lab, co-op members will be given finished compost to use at their homes and any remaining compost will be given back to the Brandywine Library to use for their flower beds surrounding the building.

The main goal for Gregory is to make composting accessible, especially to people without access to a backyard or with differing abilities.

"It's a starting point," Gregory said. "We can at least start opening some doors."

Stretch of Brandywine Trail to Close for Improvements

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today that a section of the Brandywine Trail will be closed until early May for improvements. This is the first project to be implemented from the recently approved Brandywine Creek State Park Trail Plan.The trail will be closed from Rockland Ro...

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today that a section of the Brandywine Trail will be closed until early May for improvements. This is the first project to be implemented from the recently approved Brandywine Creek State Park Trail Plan.

The trail will be closed from Rockland Road to Rocky Run Bridge, which is along the trail. The small parking lot at the Rockland Road trail head will be closed for construction equipment. Closures will be marked with signage and updates will be posted to the Brandywine Creek State Park Facebook page.

The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation will pave and complete drainage repairs to the trail, which lies over an old roadbed that was once paved with macadam. The volume of water that flows off neighboring developments and downward over the Brandywine Trail causes stone debris to wash into the Brandywine Creek. This project is approximately $475,000 from Statewide Trails and Pathways funding. The trail plan also calls for resurfacing the Brandywine Trail from Thompson’s Bridge Road to the state park’s boundary line with First State National Historical Park in the near future.

“This work will minimize material that washes from the trail into Brandywine Creek during heavy storm events and allows greater access to people with disabilities,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “Hardening a trail surface is never our first choice, but this is the best option for a sustainable riverside trail that can withstand the harsh weather and high usage.”

Nearly 90,000 walks, hikes, runs and bike rides are taken along the Brandywine Creek State Park’s portion of the Brandywine Trail annually. This shared-use trail is a segment of the Northern Delaware Greenway, which traverses several state and county parks in northern New Castle County. Trail-related activities are the No. 1 outdoor recreation activities in Delaware to fulfill public needs and trends, according to the 2018-2023 Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

The Brandywine Creek State Park Trail Plan was created to guide trail investments and improvement for the next 10 years. Public engagement began in October 2015 with an open house, followed by input from a stakeholder working group and a survey for members of the public. After COVID-19 delayed plan progress, the final draft was presented at public meetings to the Delaware Parks and Recreation Council’s in February 2022 and the Council on Greenways and Trails in May before final approval by the division June 1, 2022.

The plan includes surface improvements to achieve a higher level of sustainability for 8.4 miles, or 50%, Brandywine Creek State Park’s trails. The division also aims to increase accessible trails in the park by 2.2 miles. Other goals in the plan are to ensure the trail system is safe, minimize impact to high quality habitats, and reduce erosion and associated issues.

The division will also commence work on a separate project at the park later this year to replace the existing Thompson Bridge composting pit toilet facility with a new concrete building. Once complete, the bathroom will be ADA-accessible and have flushless vault toilets, engineered ventilation, comfortable lighting, a modern interior and an exterior that fits the setting. Closures in that area will be minimal, limited to weekdays and announced via Facebook.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. Enjoy the natural diversity of Delaware’s 17 state parks. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, [email protected] or Michael Globetti, [email protected].

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Climbing walls, batting cages, indoor golf: Dick's to open House of Sport store in Delaware

Delaware will soon be home to a whole new kind of Dick’s.Bigger. Maybe better. Certainly, more of an active experience.Construction crews are already busy digging out the poured concrete interior of a former Bed, Bath & ...

Delaware will soon be home to a whole new kind of Dick’s.

Bigger. Maybe better. Certainly, more of an active experience.

Construction crews are already busy digging out the poured concrete interior of a former Bed, Bath & Beyond at Brandywine Town Center on Concord Pike, next to an already sprawling Dick’s Sporting Goods location.

Soon, say landlords Acadia Realty Trust, Dick's will double in size by expanding into the empty space next door. The chain will debut the first Delaware location of a massive new store concept called Dick’s House of Sport, an experiential concept store that Dick’s president, Lauren Hobart, has said is “redefining sports retail.”

The Dick’s Sporting Goods chain began rolling out its new House of Sport concept two years ago in upstate New York, part of a broader shift in the retail world to a more immersive experience that retailers hope will bring shoppers to malls and big-box spaces.

Previous Houses of Sport have included rock climbing walls. Augmented-reality batting cages. Indoor putting greens. Treadmills to test running shoes, and mixed surfaces to try out cleats. Some have even included outdoor fields and running tracks.

Though the chain has advertised ambitious plans to roll out as many as 100 stores in the next half-decade, only a dozen Houses of Sports exist so far.

Delaware’s would be the only House of Sport within 140 miles. The nearest is in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Dick's is tight-lipped about details on the Brandywine House of Sport location

Dick’s corporate PR has been mum about details on the upcoming House of Sport location. So were staff at the existing Brandywine Town Center Dick’s — though one worker there couldn’t stop laughing as another employee said he wasn’t sure which House of Sport we were talking about.

“He’s acting like he doesn’t know!” she said, smiling.

However, the chain confirmed a Fall 2024 projected opening for a Brandywine House of Sport shortly after this article published online.

Plans with New Castle County show Dick's taking over the space previously held by Bed Bath & Beyond. Site drawings show that the combined Dick's and Bed Bath & Beyond space would amount to just over 100,000 square feet, on par with previous House of Sport locations.

Town Center owner Acadia Realty said Dick's signed a lease for the combined space.

“We are excited about our lease with DICK’S Sporting Goods at Brandywine Town Center,” wrote Acadia senior director Josh Bissinger. “They will be expanding into the adjacent former Bed Bath & Beyond space and introducing their larger-format House of Sport concept. They are expecting to open in late 2024.”

Other plans at Brandywine Town Center are less certain, after proposal withdrawn

Acadia was less eager to talk about other big plans announced this year for Brandywine Town Center.

This February, the mall’s owner laid out an ambitious new proposal to demolish the existing Red Robin and community center, and install six buildings for "high-end" restaurants or retailers surrounding a pond.

Previous Brandywine coverage:How Brandywine Town Center could reinvent itself starting with new restaurants and stores

The plan, which would add 45,000 square feet in new retail space, was designed as a “shot in the arm” for the shopping center, which had 150,000 feet of vacant space as of February.

Since then, the shopping center's Bed Bath & Beyond and Friendly’s locations have both also closed.

Acadia quietly withdrew plans for the new retail and restaurant construction in October, and did not respond to the News Journal's inquiries about plans for the site. The Red Robin remains open as of November, and the community center still sits serenely by the pond.

However, the big box-filled side of the shopping center near Dick’s is a bright spot for Brandywine Town Center, Acadia’s Bissinger told the News Journal in February. The Target store next door is one of the chain’s most successful locations in the region, he said.

House of Sport an apparent success for Dick's Sporting Goods in other cities

Dick’s House of Sport locations have been popular in other cities where they’ve opened, according to company officials and online reviews. The chain saw a modest 3.6% growth in net sales over the past quarter, according to reports to investors.

“Our newest six concepts have proven to be tremendously successful. And are a key part of our future,” Dick’s president Hobart told trade publication Modern Retail this year.

One customer at the Knoxville House of Sport said it was a “a layout that makes you feel like you're walking into a movie,” in an online review of the store.

“If anything keeps physical stores from disappearing it's this style of store that will do it,” wrote another.

The openings of other House of Sport locations have been accompanied by surprise visits from sports stars. In July, the Latham, New York, opening included the Yankees' Tino Martinez, Adam Graves of the Rangers and WNBA analyst Rebecca Lobo.

At least 10 House of Sport stores are planned for 2024 in total, Dick’s announced this fall.

Presumably, Brandywine Town Center will be among them.

Matthew Korfhage is business and development reporter in the Delaware region covering all the things that touch land and money: openings and closings, construction, and the many corporations who call the First State home. A longtime food writer, he also tends to turn up with stories about tacos, oysters and beer. Send tips and insults to [email protected].

DNREC to Host Brandywine Creek State Park Trail Plan Public Meeting

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control will host two public meetings to discuss the Brandywine Trail improvement project, which began construction on Feb. 27, on Wednesday, March 15, at 4:00 and 6:30 p.m. at the Blue Ball Barn in Alapocas Run State Park, Wilmington.Those who are unable to attend and have questions on the improvement project or trail plan can visit ...

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control will host two public meetings to discuss the Brandywine Trail improvement project, which began construction on Feb. 27, on Wednesday, March 15, at 4:00 and 6:30 p.m. at the Blue Ball Barn in Alapocas Run State Park, Wilmington.

Those who are unable to attend and have questions on the improvement project or trail plan can visit destateparks.com/contact and select “Brandywine Creek State Park Trail Plan” from the Delaware State Parks location drop-down menu.

The improvement project is part of the Brandywine Creek State Park Trail Plan, which was created to guide trail investments and improvement for the next 10 years and approved after a multiyear planning process in June 2022. Public participation was a core component in developing this plan. Discussions were held with representatives of trail and park user groups regarding the trail plan. The plan was also presented at multiple public meetings, including open houses in 2015 and 2019 and a Council on Greenways and Trails meeting in May 2022.

About DNREC

About DNREC The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, [email protected] or Michael Globetti, [email protected].

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