Knee Pain Treatment in Claymont, DE

Non-Surgical Knee Pain and Arthritis Specialists in Claymont, DE

Our knees are incredible structures that withstand a lot of pressure and strain from everyday activities like running, jumping, and walking. Unfortunately, inflammation and injury can happen if we overwork or misuse these joints. Even with the best care, osteoarthritis can develop, causing knee pain. While some people turn to surgery or medication for quick relief, this approach can be counterproductive. Have you ever thought about how painful and long recovery can be when you undergo a knee replacement?

At Kennedy Health, we believe there are better options for solving your knee pain - not temporarily, but for years to come. Unlike other providers, our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Claymont, DE, focus on finding and solving the root cause of your knee pain. That way, we can provide more comprehensive and long-lasting relief to our patients.

Regenerative medicine for knee pain is both a safe and effective option to consider, especially if you're wary about the pitfalls of knee replacement surgery or powerful pain medications. What types of knee pain and conditions can regenerative medicine from Kennedy Health solve? Our range of cutting-edge treatments can address a number of musculoskeletal issues, including:

  • ACL Tears
  • MCL Tears
  • Arthritis
  • Tendonitis
  • Ligament Inflammation
  • Tendon Inflammation
  • Knee Tears
  • More

If you have been searching high and low for a knee pain clinic offering natural healing, tissue regeneration, and improved quality of life, our knee pain specialists are here to help.

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The Knee Pain and

Arthritis Specialists in Claymont, DE You Can Trust

As we age, the wear and tear on our muscles and joints can cause discomfort and pain. While it's true that some people believe that these aches and pains are an inevitable part of aging, many knee pain doctors challenge this assumption. At Kennedy Health, our team of arthritis and knee pain specialists aims to provide natural therapies that activate your body's innate ability to heal and renew its tissues. Rather than relying on harmful surgeries and sketchy pain medicines, we're laser-focused on harnessing this remarkable power so that you have a viable alternative to going under the knife.

Joints-Bone

While surgery may be necessary in some cases, it's essential to recognize that it's not always the best solution for every type of pain. Our non-surgical knee pain treatments have proven to be highly effective in resolving discomfort and restoring mobility for many of our patients. During your consultation with us, our experienced team will evaluate your current condition and needs with sensitivity and care.

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We understand the impact that pain can have on your life and are committed to providing the most effective and appropriate knee pain treatment for your unique situation. If surgery is the best option for you, we will offer our professional advice and guidance to help you make an informed decision. However, if our regenerative knee pain therapy is a viable alternative, we will take the time to discuss your options in detail and work with you to design a personalized treatment plan that meets your specific needs.

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Non-Surgical Knee Pain Claymont, DE

Is Knee Replacement Surgery Your Best Option?

Picture this: After trying medication and cortisone injections to no avail, your physician has suggested surgery as the only remaining option for your excruciating knee pain. Though surgery is a daunting prospect due to the potential risks and lengthy recovery time, you trust that your doctor has your best interests at heart.

But is a knee replacement really the best choice for long-lasting relief from pain? At Kennedy Health, our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Claymont, DE believe there's a better way.

How Does Regenerative Medicine Help Chronic Knee Pain?

The natural ability of the human body to heal itself is truly remarkable. From repairing broken bones to sealing cuts and fighting off infections, the body is equipped with powerful healing mechanisms. But in cases of severe injury or illness, regenerative medicine may provide a viable solution. By utilizing cutting-edge techniques such as cell therapy, bioengineering, and gene therapy, regenerative medicine aims to enhance the body's own healing capabilities.

Regenerative therapies are seen as the future of medicine, representing a shift away from traditional medical interventions. They hold tremendous promise for treating chronic conditions like osteoarthritis, as well as more serious diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's. As the field of regenerative medicine continues to evolve, new treatments are constantly emerging, rendering older methods obsolete.

For instance, microfracture procedures, which were once used to treat cartilage defects leading to arthritis, are no longer favored in the US. Instead, knee pain and arthritis specialists in Claymont, DE prefer regenerative knee pain treatments like platelet-rich plasma therapy, which has proven to be highly effective for chronic knee pain sufferers.

Can Regenerative Medicine Really Help You Avoid Knee Replacement Surgery?

At Kennedy Health, we receive inquiries almost every day from folks just like you who have been fighting through chronic knee pain. They come to us excited about - yet still unsure of - regenerative medicine for their knees. They wonder whether or not these treatments are truly effective. Fortunately, by providing them with a custom recovery plan tailored to their body, we can show them it works, not just tell them.

As a popular new form of treatment, many studies have been conducted into the efficacy of treatments such as PRP, prolotherapy, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, and more. In fact, regenerative medical therapies are actively being pursued by renowned institutions like Harvard and the Mayo Clinic. The NIH recognizes that regenerative medicine is a highly promising treatment option for addressing knee pain and other diseases.

Additionally, the FDA maintains high efficacy and safety standards by overseeing various regenerative medicines, while organizations such as the AATB focus on ethical considerations in the advancement of regenerative medical therapies.

If you've been looking everywhere for a knee pain relief clinic but keep failing to find a solution tailored to your body, regenerative therapy may be the answer. Our patients report real relief from knee pain without suffering through issues common to knee replacements, such as:

  • Unneeded Complications
  • Long and Painful Recovery Times
  • Prescription Pain Pills
  • Anesthesia
  • Unnecessary Scar Tissue and Knee Scarring
  • Expensive and Ineffective Surgery
 Kennedy Health Claymont, DE

Who Benefits Most from Knee Pain and Arthritis Specialists in Claymont, DE?

Regenerative medicines have been proven to help men and women with a wide range of common issues, from skin care needs to injury healing. When it comes to knee pain, regenerative therapies are becoming the go-to choice over knee replacements. If you're experiencing one or more of the following conditions, it may be time to see a knee pain and arthritis specialist from Kennedy Health.

 Knee Replacement Surgery Claymont, DE
Knee Arthritis

Knee Arthritis

Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis can lead to knee pain, stiffness, and inflammation due to cartilage degeneration or autoimmune responses. In terms of common knee problems, arthritis is near the top of the list and can often be treated without needing a knee replacement or surgery.

Overuse

Repetitive Stress and Overuse

Repetitive movements or prolonged stress on the knee joint, such as running or jumping, can lead to chronic knee pain caused by conditions like patellofemoral pain syndrome or iliotibial band syndrome.

Tendonitis

Tendonitis

Inflammation of tendons, such as patellar or quadriceps tendonitis, can cause knee pain and difficulty with movement.

Injuries

Trauma and Injuries

Knee injuries, including ligament tears (ACL, MCL, or meniscus), fractures, dislocations, or strains, can cause acute pain and instability in the knee.

Ligaments

Torn Ligaments

Damage to the ACL, MCL, or other knee ligaments can lead to instability in the knee joint, discomfort, and challenges with weight-bearing tasks.

3 Reasons to Re-Think a Knee Replacement Surgery

If your doctor is saying that a knee replacement is the only option available to eliminate your knee pain, consider it a red flag. Before you go under the knife, consider these potential pitfalls:

Knee ReplacementSurgery Alternatives from Kennedy Health

Do you often experience joint pain that interferes with your daily activities and causes discomfort? Joint pain - especially in your knees - can be particularly debilitating, making it difficult to stand, sit, squat, or enjoy time with loved ones. While sports injuries often result in knee pain, most chronic issues stem from the gradual deterioration of tissue that supports your joints.

For example, the cartilage in your knee, which cushions your joints, can break down, causing bones to rub together, which leads to arthritis. Thankfully, non-surgical medical treatments for knee pain and arthritis have come a long way in the last two decades. At Kennedy Health, we offer a variety of regenerative alternatives to knee surgery that can provide long-term relief from tissue breakdown in your knees.

Here are just a few of the most popular treatment options provided by our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Claymont, DE.

Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Knee Pain

PRP, which stands for platelet-rich plasma, is a special type of blood plasma that contains a higher concentration of platelets than usual. Platelets are blood cells that aid in the growth and healing of the body. For people experiencing knee joint pain, PRP injections may be beneficial in reducing inflammation and promoting healing.

First, one of our specialists extracts a small amount of blood from your body. That blood is placed in a centrifuge. The centrifuge then spins the blood, causing your platelets to separate from the red blood cells. This platelet-rich plasma is then injected into your knee. With time, your body's own healing mechanisms provide joint pain relief, which can help you avoid surgery.

 Heal Your Knees Claymont, DE

Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy for Knee Pain

Shockwave therapy involves delivering high-energy sound waves to the affected areas of your knees, which can help stimulate healing, pain reduction, and tissue regeneration. Shockwave therapy can also be very helpful when it comes to restoring your overall knee functionality because it breaks down scar tissue and stimulates blood vessel growth, both of which are crucial for long-lasting relief.

 Kennedy Health Claymont, DE

Laser Therapy for Knee Pain

Most folks don't think about lasers when it comes to treating their chronic knee pain. But in modern times, truth is often stranger than fiction. Unlike high-level laser treatment, laser therapy for knee pain directs light energy to the affected area without causing any damage to the skin. By sending a 30-second light pulse into the knee, the light energy effectively penetrates deep into the joint and triggers chemical changes that promote the healing and growth of damaged cells and tissues. Contact Kennedy Health today for more information on this remarkable regenerative treatment.

 Knee Replacement Surgery Claymont, DE

Prolotherapy for Knee Pain

Regenerative injection therapy, or prolotherapy, is a medical procedure that aims to trigger your body's natural healing process by injecting a solution into the affected area of your knees. This exciting technique can help to strengthen your tendons, ligaments, and joints, which ultimately lessens your pain and improves your stability.

 Claymont, DE

True Relief from Knee Pain Begins with Custom Treatment from Kennedy Health

Are you sick and tired of your knees holding you back from enjoying life to its fullest? Few things are as heartbreaking as not being able to enjoy activities with your kids, grandkids, and loved ones. If you're suffering from knee pain due to an injury, arthritis, or another condition, don't settle for a lifetime of pain or harmful surgery. Fight back with regenerative medicine from Kennedy Health.

Our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Claymont, DE will conduct a thorough evaluation of your knees, including a review of your medical history and diagnostic tests to determine the best treatment for your specific type of pain.

Unlike some clinics, our team prioritizes personalized care and works closely with you to develop a comprehensive approach to managing your symptoms. It all starts by scheduling a consultation at our office. If you're ready to reclaim your active lifestyle, we're here to support you every step of the way.

Latest News in Claymont, DE

Big plans are afoot for iconic Claymont Steak Shop: A new building, and maybe a sports bar

First things first: Don't panic.But big changes are afoot at one of the oldest and greatest icons in the Delaware cheesesteak pantheon, the 57-year-old Claymont Steak Shop.Its owners, Basil and Demi Kollias, plan to tear down the old building and rebuild their restaurant in a brand new one, creating what they hope will be a better Claymont Steak Shop that can last another half century — expanded, spiffier, an...

First things first: Don't panic.

But big changes are afoot at one of the oldest and greatest icons in the Delaware cheesesteak pantheon, the 57-year-old Claymont Steak Shop.

Its owners, Basil and Demi Kollias, plan to tear down the old building and rebuild their restaurant in a brand new one, creating what they hope will be a better Claymont Steak Shop that can last another half century — expanded, spiffier, and maybe even with a patio and a sports bar. If they do it the way they've planned it, the steak shop wouldn't have to close for more than a week.

As it stands, the building would need a whole lot of work to stay in its current location.

"We had two choices," said Basil Kollias. "We could either sink a lot of money into a very old building, one that's already a patchwork from the last 60 years-plus, or we could tear it down and start fresh with something brand new and nice."

New and nice is the plan, they said.

Claymont Steak Shop is a revered tradition in Delaware

Demi Kollias takes the preservation of her family's steak shop seriously, she said, founded in 1966 by cousins and Greek immigrants Bob Hionis and Sam Demetratos.

She knows that she will hear from her customers if she changes anything too much.

It is, after all, the cheesesteak favored by our nation's president, whom Demi Kollias — like a lot of people in Delaware — tends to simply call "Joe." And for the record, the president's cheesesteak order is apparently provolone, fried onions and sweet peppers; customers still sometimes come in to order a cheesesteak the way the president does.

Where does Joe eat?:Some of Joe Biden's favorite Delaware foods

It is also where Delaware native Jim "Cheesesteak Adventure" Pappas, eater of a literal thousand cheesesteaks, said he first learned to love the holy quaternity of meat, cheese, onion and Italian roll.

The steaks at Claymont are very particular, said Demi Kollias.

The meat is ribeye, and a lot of it — as much as the roll can comfortably hold. No salt or pepper, even, unless you ask for it. Nothing but marbled meat. The onions are sliced twice daily and they look like onions, not diced-up cubes. New-fangled whiz is offered, but still frowned-upon compared to old-fangled American or provolone.

The bread comes from the same place as always, Serpe and Sons Bakery, custom-made for Claymont Steak Shop so the roll remains soft but still holds up to mountain of ribeye in each sandwich.

"There is quality," said Demi Kollias, "but there is also quantity."

New Claymont Steak Shop plans call for a mixed-use development on Philadelphia Pike

But even if Demi Kollias will not change her cheesesteaks, Claymont Steak Shop will change dramatically nonetheless.

The plans, wending their way through New Castle County's approval process since September, call for the current site of Claymont Steak Shop to be replaced by a side-by-side pair of three-story mixed-use buildings. The new Claymont Steak Shop, as well as some retail space for another tenant, would be on the first floor. The upper floors would house 19 apartments.

The Kolliases own property on both sides of their steak shop, and also undeveloped property at the rear that will accommodate the new parking spaces.

Presidential haunt:President Biden dines at 'old-school' Wilmington restaurant that holds memories

The plans would turn the cheesesteak shop into a new puzzle piece in the fast-developing Claymont neighborhood that Basil Kollias has been working to build as president of the board of the Claymont Renaissance Development Corporation.

There's the Darley Green residential development across Philadelphia Pike. The new Claymont train station. A host of new development plans at the former steel mill site that could bring as many as 5,000 new residents to the area, according to Claymont Renaissance Development Corporation executive director Brett Saddler.

The new steak shop, said Basil Kollias, will be integrated into a whole new Claymont.

More:Sneak peek of the new $90M Claymont transportation center, opening soon to rail commuters

Claymont Steak Shop will not have to close during construction. And may add a patio and a bar

The steak shop wouldn't have to close, Basil Kollias said — or at least, not for longer than a week.

The plan, on its face, is ingenious: The Kolliases will leave Claymont Steak Shop open while they start construction on a new building next door that will be home to the new restaurant space. When the new Claymont Steak Shop is ready to open, they'll simply turn off the lights at one place, and turn them on next door.

The decor will remain classic enough keep the feel of the old place, but still be shined up and modernized a little, they said. The biggest changes to the layout will happen in the back of house, where the kitchen can be made more efficient.

During phase two of construction, the original Claymont Steak Shop will be demolished, and a new building would go in with retail space at the bottom.

Depending on what the world looks like when the second phase of construction is finished — a process that will likely take years — Kollias may add a sports bar next door, following the same model that the pair pioneered at the newer Newark location. That way, customers can have both a cheesesteak and a beer at the same place. The Kolliases also hope to add a patio for outdoor dining on warm days.

"I think it will look great," said Demi Kollias. "And I think if we end up having the bar, it will be my husband's dream come true. Because he's gonna be the bartender."

Kollias, a real estate lawyer, politely turned down his wife's job offer.

Construction plans are still in the exploratory phase. But if all goes well, they hope to begin moving forward by the end of 2024. In the meantime, we wondered, does President Biden still stop by Claymont Steak Shop?

"The last time I saw him here, he was vice president," said Basil Kollias.

Demi gives him the kind of look that wives sometimes give husbands.

"I saw him when he was president, too!" she said. But before he was president, she said, it was casual. "You'd see Joe ..., at the register," she said.

Now, people from the Biden camp tend to call in their orders. Maybe, she said, you see the Secret Service come in.

And if they get a cheesesteak, they never say whether it's for Joe.

Matthew Korfhage is business and development reporter in the Delaware region covering all the things that touch land and money, and the many corporations who call the First State home. A longtime food writer, he also tends to turn up with stories about tacos, oysters and beer. Send tips and insults to [email protected].

New $90M+ Claymont rail station brings potential

CLAYMONT – Hundreds of people turned out Monday morning to celebrate the culmination of a project that many thought might never be completed: a new Claymont Transit Station.Replacing a smaller, aging rail station just to the south, the new station will serve as a major regional rail artery from Wilmington’s suburbs into the greater Philadelphia market via SEPTA train service. It also will be a hub for DART b...

CLAYMONT – Hundreds of people turned out Monday morning to celebrate the culmination of a project that many thought might never be completed: a new Claymont Transit Station.

Replacing a smaller, aging rail station just to the south, the new station will serve as a major regional rail artery from Wilmington’s suburbs into the greater Philadelphia market via SEPTA train service. It also will be a hub for DART bus service across the First State.

The more than $90 million project was made possible through more than $51 million in Federal Transit Administration funding, including a $10 million in a competitive U.S. Department of Transportation TIGER grant. The state contributed more than $38 million toward the project.

Brett Saddler, the executive director of the Claymont Renaissance Development Corp., a nonprofit that was formed to help plan and guide the revitalization of the unincorporated northern Delaware community that was home to both President Joe Biden and Gov. John Carney, said he was a bit in awe of the finished product.

“After 14 years of being asked by Claymont residents, ‘When are we getting that new train station you promised?’ … I can finally say today,” he said to applause from many of the locals who joined the ceremony.

SEPTA and DART service will begin at the new Harris B. McDowell III Transportation Center on Monday, Dec. 4, replacing the previous station on Myrtle Avenue that will be decommissioned and hoped to turn into a public trailhead. The new facility features a number of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) improvements, including elevators over the tracks and level platforms to trains.

The new facility also includes a 464-space parking garage that offers covered parking to Claymont commuters for the first time, and another 343 spaces on an outdoor lot, which in total increases available parking by about 60%.

While about 1,200 people use the Claymont station on SEPTA’s Wilmington-Newark line, Saddler believes those numbers will grow in coming years. That’s due in part to First State Crossing, a major redevelopment of the former Evraz steel mill adjacent to the train station, that is welcoming major employment centers like an Agile Cold Storage warehouse and a First Industrial Realty Trust facility.

Stephen Collins, executive vice president of St. Louis-based Commercial Development Company (CDC), which is investing millions into First State Crossing, said he considered it an “anchor” of the Claymont community and his company’s mixed-use project.

“Commuters will be able to come to work here and shop here, and we think it’d be a great asset for the community and the project,” he told Delaware Business Times, adding that CDC believes the opening of the station will prompt new interest from investors to look at the area.

CDC plans to build upward of 1,200 residential homes northeast of the train station, as well as additional retail and potentially a small number of offices.

“Obviously the commuter station will be a great asset to those people who want to live in Claymont, Delaware, where the taxes are much lower than they are in Philadelphia and New Jersey, and they can go up to the Hospital District or downtown Philadelphia to work,” Collins added.

The opening of the facility comes just a few weeks after President Biden announced $16 billion in new funding for Amtrak that would fix issues along its heavily traveled Northeast Corridor, which runs through Delaware. In a letter, the president, who famously rode Amtrak to Washington every week for more than three decades, congratulated state leaders in completing the new Claymont station.

“I know how much it matters to be able to get to work on time. I know how much it matters to get home and see your family after a long day. I know how frustrating it feels to be delayed at the station when something goes wrong. As president, I have worked relentlessly to make our transportation infrastructure faster, safer and more reliable for all Americans. And the Harris B. McDowell III Transportation Center sets the standard for what we should expect from new infrastructure projects,” he wrote. “[It] will better connect our communities, strengthen our economy and help chart the course of Claymont’s future.”

The president also congratulated McDowell, who was the longest-serving member of the General Assembly when he retired in 2021 with 45 years of service. The lifelong Claymont resident was honored with the naming of the transit station, in part because he was the godfather of climate change legislation in the state and advocated for a strong public transit system.

Many turned out Monday to celebrate his contributions and the naming of the new station.

“He has the ability to see the world not just as it is, but as it should, as it could be. When he sees injustice, he sees seeks to right it. When he sees environmental degradation, he seeks to advance justice. When he sees poverty, he seeks to expand opportunity. And today, this facility is named after a man who didn’t just see a different world, but help to deliver it,” said State Sen. Sarah McBride, who succeeded McDowell in representing the First Senate District.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with full cost figures for the project, moving it to more than $90 million.

Claymont Christmas Weed, a 30-year Delaware tradition, is celebrated at Saturday parade

The words "Christmas Weed" these days might mean something a little different than they did 30 years ago.But back in 1993, because of a resilient little fir growing in a crack in a highway, a very goofy Delaware holiday tradition began in Claymont and it endures to this day.There's even a well-attended Christmas parade, which started in 1998 and steps off this Saturday at 10 a.m. in Claymo...

The words "Christmas Weed" these days might mean something a little different than they did 30 years ago.

But back in 1993, because of a resilient little fir growing in a crack in a highway, a very goofy Delaware holiday tradition began in Claymont and it endures to this day.

There's even a well-attended Christmas parade, which started in 1998 and steps off this Saturday at 10 a.m. in Claymont, that's built around the tradition.

And a song. And a fable.

The backstory on the Claymont Christmas Weed

It all started on a slow news day on Dec. 16, 1993, a little more than a week before Christmas.

The late News Journal photographer Donaghey G. Brown snapped some sweet photos of a wild fir tree growing from a crack in Philadelphia Pike near the I-495 exit in Claymont.

The scraggly little thing was decorated with ornaments and gold garland, apparently by passing motorists or local residents.

One of the photos ran on the front page of The News Journal on Dec. 17, 1993, and a cheeky copy editor (and were there ever any other kind?) slapped on a headline: "O Christmas Weed."

In the news business, this is known as a "bright," a short, amusing story intended to delight newspaper readers as they sip their coffee.

That morning a lot of eyes saw Brown's uplifting photo, but apparently, not everyone found the humor.

The Delaware Department of Transportation, in particular, viewed the weed as a traffic hazard, not a holiday symbol. Cue the bah-humbugs.

In the interest of public safety, though some have described it as the ultimate Scrooge-y move, DelDOT, that same morning, chopped down "the weed."

A Yuletide throwdown began

Another tree went up, but, a short time later, it was stolen. And it happened again. And again.

Eight trees later, The News Journal, with the help of a local security company, stepped in and then-Executive Editor John N. Walston hired a guard to watch over "the weed" until Christmas Day.

Really. It should be noted, this was back in the day when newspapers were a lot more flush.

And just to put even more nutty icing on the fruitcake, former reporter/editor Al Mascitti wrote a fable called "The Christmas Weed," which appeared in The News Journal on Dec. 25, 1993.

Several readers wrote Letters to the Editor saying how much they enjoyed Mascitti's tale.

The 'Weed' today

The wacky Christmas Weed tradition continues and Barbara Harbin said she is not at all surprised.

"We say it represents Claymont. We're not pretty, but we're plucky. We are resilient and we keep coming back," she told Delaware Online/The News Journal in 2018.

The Claymont Christmas parade steps off at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 2, and runs along the Philadelphia Pike from Maple Lane Elementary to Darley Road. It concludes at noon.

The weed will be blessed and decorated at the Church of the Ascension at 3717 Philadelphia Pike, immediately after the parade. It is then placed on Philadelphia Pike.

Harbin, who had organized the parade and weed decorating since 2004, said in 2018 that no one tries to steal the weed anymore.

"It's famous now. It's so famous, people come from out of state to see it. Even DelDOT leaves it alone," she said.

Still, just in case anyone has sticky fingers or unkind intentions, there's a little added insurance so the weed stays put.

"We ziplock it to the post that's at the median," Harbin said.

The "weed" today remains true to its original roots. It's scrawny and about 4 feet tall, though Harbin admits "it doesn't look a whole lot like the first one."

"A couple of years back, we went out and dug it out of the woods. We used to do that every year, " Harbin said "but I got tired of tromping through the woods in the snow and rain."

Harbin said she made an executive decision in 2016: "I decided we're going to plant this sucker. I dug a hole in my yard and planted it. I just dig it up now and put it in a bucket every year. In January, I'll put it back in the hole."

Contact Patricia Talorico at [email protected] or 302-324-2861 and follow her on X (Twitter) @pattytalorico Sign up for her Delaware Eats newsletter.

Agile Cold Storage Selects Delaware Site For $170M Facility

A Georgia-based company will bring 130 new jobs to Claymont, Delaware, and invest more than $170 million over five years.Agile Cold Storage plans to build a 275,000-square-foot cold-storage facility in the New Castle County city as it meets demand from North American food manufacturers, processors, and growers.The project also will bring investment and industry to Claymont – a community still affected by past industrial closings – and support business at the Port of Wilmington and future operations at the proposed p...

A Georgia-based company will bring 130 new jobs to Claymont, Delaware, and invest more than $170 million over five years.

Agile Cold Storage plans to build a 275,000-square-foot cold-storage facility in the New Castle County city as it meets demand from North American food manufacturers, processors, and growers.

The project also will bring investment and industry to Claymont – a community still affected by past industrial closings – and support business at the Port of Wilmington and future operations at the proposed port expansion at Edgemoor.

Delaware Prosperity Partnership has worked with Agile Cold over the past year, and in late August supported Agile Cold’s request for Jobs Performance and Capital Expenditures grants from the Council on Development Finance. The grants provide up to $510,500 and $4.05 million, respectively, from the Delaware Strategic Fund.

Distribution of these grants is dependent upon the company meeting commitments as outlined to the CDF, which reviewed and approved Agile Cold’s request.

The company’s Agile Cold Claymont division will locate in First State Crossing, a brownfield property that previously was a steel mill, along Naamans Road. Employment opportunities will be available at the management and supervisor level, along with general laborers, forklift operators, inventory control, customer service and maintenance. More jobs could also become available through partner service providers.

Agile Cold specializes in blast freezing, layer/case picking, cross docking, export services, tempering and e-commerce and offers automation in warehouse receiving, storage and shipping and a multi-temperature storage network suitable for a wide variety of inventory.

The company, which was founded in 2020, operates two facilities in the Metro Atlanta area and is planning a third in Macon. Adding an automated multi-temperature warehouse in Delaware will allow Agile Cold to expand into the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast markets and help meet growing proximity-related demands for fresh, refrigerated and frozen foods and more frequent deliveries.

Delaware Governor John Carney said the facility will create “good jobs and economic investment” in the city of roughly 15,300 people.

“Their operations will build on Delaware’s strong foundation in food manufacturing and transportation, helping our region’s supply chain,” Carney said.

Check out all the latest news related to Delaware economic development, corporate relocation, corporate expansion and site selection.

Agile Cold Storage to build $170 million facility in Claymont with taxpayer help

A $170 million cold storage facility will one day replace a steel mill scrap yard in Claymont with the help of more than $4.5 million from Delaware taxpayers.Agile Cold Storage, a 3-year-old Gainesville, Georgia, company, plans to build a climate-controlled warehouse south of Naamans Road and west of the I-95 and I-495 interchange. The company will employ 130 people at the facility at an average annual salary of $56,000.It is one of two industrial projects planned at First State Crossing, ...

A $170 million cold storage facility will one day replace a steel mill scrap yard in Claymont with the help of more than $4.5 million from Delaware taxpayers.

Agile Cold Storage, a 3-year-old Gainesville, Georgia, company, plans to build a climate-controlled warehouse south of Naamans Road and west of the I-95 and I-495 interchange. The company will employ 130 people at the facility at an average annual salary of $56,000.

It is one of two industrial projects planned at First State Crossing, a large-scale mixed-use redevelopment of the Claymont steel mill property. The state Council on Development Finance on Monday approved a $4,560,500 grant for the project. The money comes from Delaware's Strategic Fund, a pool of state money directed toward business retention and attraction.

Who is Agile Cold Storage?

Agile Cold Storage stores and distributes products for other companies, acting as a third-party cog in the supply chain. The Claymont facility will be its first in the region — the company has two warehouses in Georgia with a third on the way.

Each warehouse serves between three and five customers, John Ripple, senior vice president for automation, told the Council on Development Finance on Monday. More than half of the Claymont facility will be dedicated to imported protein, Ripple said, which is stored for several months. Agile will bring an existing customer to Claymont and has a second lined up that will be moving its business from New Jersey's Port of Newark.

Ripple said the Claymont site was attractive because it is about halfway between the Port of Wilmington and the Packer Avenue Terminal in Philadelphia. Ripple said products imported to the Philadelphia port are being transported across the river to New Jersey and later driven back over to end users. Agile feels it can fit a need serving those companies and others at the Port of Wilmington, which has limited cold storage capacity.

There is a mix of uses around the property, including the Knollwood community just to the south. A truck entrance will be constructed at Ridge Road, and an employee entrance will be across from the Tri-State Mall property. The loading stalls will be on the opposite side of the building from Naamans Road.

The state grant

Agile's grant is the largest approved by the Council on Development Finance this year. It represents about a quarter of the Strategic Fund, which is the state's primary economic development resource.

Grant applicants are brought to the council by the Delaware Prosperity Partnership, a privately run organization set up by Gov. John Carney to oversee the state's economic development. Megan Kopistecki, DPP's senior manager for business development, emphasized the intense demand for cold storage facilities when presenting the project to the council Monday.

"More than 70% of all storage facilities in the U.S. were built before 2000, with the average facility more than 40 years old," she said. "Older facilities lack the taller ceilings and the wider column spacing that allow for increased inventory and more efficient operations."

Cold storage warehouses are more expensive to build than regular warehouses. Ripple also noted that Agile faces higher-than-usual site work costs given the property's previous use as a storage area and scrap yard for the steel mill.

The 130 jobs are due to be created in the three years after receiving funding. Typically, grant recipients face clawbacks if they don't produce the jobs in the agreed-upon timeframe.

Agile plans to build the facility in two phases beginning in September or October. The company still needs New Castle County approval before it can proceed. Construction will continue over roughly the next five years, Kopistecki said.

"Agile is looking forward to hiring our team members and servicing our customers starting next summer," Agile Cold Storage President and CEO Don Schoenl said in a statement.

What is in First State Crossing?

The former scrap yard was previously slated for office space, but First State Crossing developer Commercial Development Company of St. Louis, Missouri pursued industrial uses in the post-COVID office downturn.

Now, something of an industrial hub is forming around Naamans Road.

A 358,000-square-foot warehouse along Philadelphia Pike south of Naamans Road was the first part of First State Crossing to start construction. It is a regular speculative warehouse being built by First Industrial Realty, a Chicago-based real estate company.

It is expected to cost about $60 million and be completed in the first quarter of 2024, according to a June press release.

A separate proposal at the Tri-State Mall across Naamans Road from the Agile Cold Storage site has the approval to build a 525,000-square-foot warehouse. Developer New York-based KPR Centers has not announced a tenant. Demolition of the Tri-State Mall occurred earlier this year, and a small retail space included in the project is under construction.

Plans for First State Crossing include housing, retail and some office space. Local officials are also pursuing a riverfront park.

A new Claymont train station is expected to open in November before Thanksgiving, according to Delaware Transit Corp. CEO John Sisson.

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