Knee Pain Treatment in Tallyville, DE

Non-Surgical Knee Pain and Arthritis Specialists in Tallyville, DE

Our knees are incredible structures that withstand a lot of pressure and strain from everyday activities like running, jumping, and walking. Unfortunately, inflammation and injury can happen if we overwork or misuse these joints. Even with the best care, osteoarthritis can develop, causing knee pain. While some people turn to surgery or medication for quick relief, this approach can be counterproductive. Have you ever thought about how painful and long recovery can be when you undergo a knee replacement?

At Kennedy Health, we believe there are better options for solving your knee pain - not temporarily, but for years to come. Unlike other providers, our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Tallyville, DE, focus on finding and solving the root cause of your knee pain. That way, we can provide more comprehensive and long-lasting relief to our patients.

Regenerative medicine for knee pain is both a safe and effective option to consider, especially if you're wary about the pitfalls of knee replacement surgery or powerful pain medications. What types of knee pain and conditions can regenerative medicine from Kennedy Health solve? Our range of cutting-edge treatments can address a number of musculoskeletal issues, including:

  • ACL Tears
  • MCL Tears
  • Arthritis
  • Tendonitis
  • Ligament Inflammation
  • Tendon Inflammation
  • Knee Tears
  • More

If you have been searching high and low for a knee pain clinic offering natural healing, tissue regeneration, and improved quality of life, our knee pain specialists are here to help.

Service Areas

The Knee Pain and

Arthritis Specialists in Tallyville, DE You Can Trust

As we age, the wear and tear on our muscles and joints can cause discomfort and pain. While it's true that some people believe that these aches and pains are an inevitable part of aging, many knee pain doctors challenge this assumption. At Kennedy Health, our team of arthritis and knee pain specialists aims to provide natural therapies that activate your body's innate ability to heal and renew its tissues. Rather than relying on harmful surgeries and sketchy pain medicines, we're laser-focused on harnessing this remarkable power so that you have a viable alternative to going under the knife.

Joints-Bone

While surgery may be necessary in some cases, it's essential to recognize that it's not always the best solution for every type of pain. Our non-surgical knee pain treatments have proven to be highly effective in resolving discomfort and restoring mobility for many of our patients. During your consultation with us, our experienced team will evaluate your current condition and needs with sensitivity and care.

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We understand the impact that pain can have on your life and are committed to providing the most effective and appropriate knee pain treatment for your unique situation. If surgery is the best option for you, we will offer our professional advice and guidance to help you make an informed decision. However, if our regenerative knee pain therapy is a viable alternative, we will take the time to discuss your options in detail and work with you to design a personalized treatment plan that meets your specific needs.

Drug
Non-Surgical Knee Pain Tallyville, DE

Is Knee Replacement Surgery Your Best Option?

Picture this: After trying medication and cortisone injections to no avail, your physician has suggested surgery as the only remaining option for your excruciating knee pain. Though surgery is a daunting prospect due to the potential risks and lengthy recovery time, you trust that your doctor has your best interests at heart.

But is a knee replacement really the best choice for long-lasting relief from pain? At Kennedy Health, our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Tallyville, DE believe there's a better way.

How Does Regenerative Medicine Help Chronic Knee Pain?

The natural ability of the human body to heal itself is truly remarkable. From repairing broken bones to sealing cuts and fighting off infections, the body is equipped with powerful healing mechanisms. But in cases of severe injury or illness, regenerative medicine may provide a viable solution. By utilizing cutting-edge techniques such as cell therapy, bioengineering, and gene therapy, regenerative medicine aims to enhance the body's own healing capabilities.

Regenerative therapies are seen as the future of medicine, representing a shift away from traditional medical interventions. They hold tremendous promise for treating chronic conditions like osteoarthritis, as well as more serious diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's. As the field of regenerative medicine continues to evolve, new treatments are constantly emerging, rendering older methods obsolete.

For instance, microfracture procedures, which were once used to treat cartilage defects leading to arthritis, are no longer favored in the US. Instead, knee pain and arthritis specialists in Tallyville, DE prefer regenerative knee pain treatments like platelet-rich plasma therapy, which has proven to be highly effective for chronic knee pain sufferers.

Can Regenerative Medicine Really Help You Avoid Knee Replacement Surgery?

At Kennedy Health, we receive inquiries almost every day from folks just like you who have been fighting through chronic knee pain. They come to us excited about - yet still unsure of - regenerative medicine for their knees. They wonder whether or not these treatments are truly effective. Fortunately, by providing them with a custom recovery plan tailored to their body, we can show them it works, not just tell them.

As a popular new form of treatment, many studies have been conducted into the efficacy of treatments such as PRP, prolotherapy, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, and more. In fact, regenerative medical therapies are actively being pursued by renowned institutions like Harvard and the Mayo Clinic. The NIH recognizes that regenerative medicine is a highly promising treatment option for addressing knee pain and other diseases.

Additionally, the FDA maintains high efficacy and safety standards by overseeing various regenerative medicines, while organizations such as the AATB focus on ethical considerations in the advancement of regenerative medical therapies.

If you've been looking everywhere for a knee pain relief clinic but keep failing to find a solution tailored to your body, regenerative therapy may be the answer. Our patients report real relief from knee pain without suffering through issues common to knee replacements, such as:

  • Unneeded Complications
  • Long and Painful Recovery Times
  • Prescription Pain Pills
  • Anesthesia
  • Unnecessary Scar Tissue and Knee Scarring
  • Expensive and Ineffective Surgery
 Kennedy Health Tallyville, DE

Who Benefits Most from Knee Pain and Arthritis Specialists in Tallyville, DE?

Regenerative medicines have been proven to help men and women with a wide range of common issues, from skin care needs to injury healing. When it comes to knee pain, regenerative therapies are becoming the go-to choice over knee replacements. If you're experiencing one or more of the following conditions, it may be time to see a knee pain and arthritis specialist from Kennedy Health.

 Knee Replacement Surgery Tallyville, DE
Knee Arthritis

Knee Arthritis

Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis can lead to knee pain, stiffness, and inflammation due to cartilage degeneration or autoimmune responses. In terms of common knee problems, arthritis is near the top of the list and can often be treated without needing a knee replacement or surgery.

Overuse

Repetitive Stress and Overuse

Repetitive movements or prolonged stress on the knee joint, such as running or jumping, can lead to chronic knee pain caused by conditions like patellofemoral pain syndrome or iliotibial band syndrome.

Tendonitis

Tendonitis

Inflammation of tendons, such as patellar or quadriceps tendonitis, can cause knee pain and difficulty with movement.

Injuries

Trauma and Injuries

Knee injuries, including ligament tears (ACL, MCL, or meniscus), fractures, dislocations, or strains, can cause acute pain and instability in the knee.

Ligaments

Torn Ligaments

Damage to the ACL, MCL, or other knee ligaments can lead to instability in the knee joint, discomfort, and challenges with weight-bearing tasks.

3 Reasons to Re-Think a Knee Replacement Surgery

If your doctor is saying that a knee replacement is the only option available to eliminate your knee pain, consider it a red flag. Before you go under the knife, consider these potential pitfalls:

Knee ReplacementSurgery Alternatives from Kennedy Health

Do you often experience joint pain that interferes with your daily activities and causes discomfort? Joint pain - especially in your knees - can be particularly debilitating, making it difficult to stand, sit, squat, or enjoy time with loved ones. While sports injuries often result in knee pain, most chronic issues stem from the gradual deterioration of tissue that supports your joints.

For example, the cartilage in your knee, which cushions your joints, can break down, causing bones to rub together, which leads to arthritis. Thankfully, non-surgical medical treatments for knee pain and arthritis have come a long way in the last two decades. At Kennedy Health, we offer a variety of regenerative alternatives to knee surgery that can provide long-term relief from tissue breakdown in your knees.

Here are just a few of the most popular treatment options provided by our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Tallyville, DE.

Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Knee Pain

PRP, which stands for platelet-rich plasma, is a special type of blood plasma that contains a higher concentration of platelets than usual. Platelets are blood cells that aid in the growth and healing of the body. For people experiencing knee joint pain, PRP injections may be beneficial in reducing inflammation and promoting healing.

First, one of our specialists extracts a small amount of blood from your body. That blood is placed in a centrifuge. The centrifuge then spins the blood, causing your platelets to separate from the red blood cells. This platelet-rich plasma is then injected into your knee. With time, your body's own healing mechanisms provide joint pain relief, which can help you avoid surgery.

 Heal Your Knees Tallyville, DE

Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy for Knee Pain

Shockwave therapy involves delivering high-energy sound waves to the affected areas of your knees, which can help stimulate healing, pain reduction, and tissue regeneration. Shockwave therapy can also be very helpful when it comes to restoring your overall knee functionality because it breaks down scar tissue and stimulates blood vessel growth, both of which are crucial for long-lasting relief.

 Kennedy Health Tallyville, DE

Laser Therapy for Knee Pain

Most folks don't think about lasers when it comes to treating their chronic knee pain. But in modern times, truth is often stranger than fiction. Unlike high-level laser treatment, laser therapy for knee pain directs light energy to the affected area without causing any damage to the skin. By sending a 30-second light pulse into the knee, the light energy effectively penetrates deep into the joint and triggers chemical changes that promote the healing and growth of damaged cells and tissues. Contact Kennedy Health today for more information on this remarkable regenerative treatment.

 Knee Replacement Surgery Tallyville, DE

Prolotherapy for Knee Pain

Regenerative injection therapy, or prolotherapy, is a medical procedure that aims to trigger your body's natural healing process by injecting a solution into the affected area of your knees. This exciting technique can help to strengthen your tendons, ligaments, and joints, which ultimately lessens your pain and improves your stability.

 Tallyville, DE

True Relief from Knee Pain Begins with Custom Treatment from Kennedy Health

Are you sick and tired of your knees holding you back from enjoying life to its fullest? Few things are as heartbreaking as not being able to enjoy activities with your kids, grandkids, and loved ones. If you're suffering from knee pain due to an injury, arthritis, or another condition, don't settle for a lifetime of pain or harmful surgery. Fight back with regenerative medicine from Kennedy Health.

Our knee pain and arthritis specialists in Tallyville, DE will conduct a thorough evaluation of your knees, including a review of your medical history and diagnostic tests to determine the best treatment for your specific type of pain.

Unlike some clinics, our team prioritizes personalized care and works closely with you to develop a comprehensive approach to managing your symptoms. It all starts by scheduling a consultation at our office. If you're ready to reclaim your active lifestyle, we're here to support you every step of the way.

Latest News in Tallyville, DE

History Matters: Brandywine Hundred Historical Society

Brandywine Hundred in northern Delaware has a rich history, but much of it could easily fall under the banner of “little-known.”However, that could change with the creation of the Brandywine Hundred Historical Society to help tell the area’s stories better and more widely.In this week’s History Matters, contributor Larry Nagengast takes a look at the work needed to create the organization and what it hopes to accomplish.Caesar Rodney rode through Brandywine Hundred on his way to Philadelphia to sign the Decla...

Brandywine Hundred in northern Delaware has a rich history, but much of it could easily fall under the banner of “little-known.”However, that could change with the creation of the Brandywine Hundred Historical Society to help tell the area’s stories better and more widely.In this week’s History Matters, contributor Larry Nagengast takes a look at the work needed to create the organization and what it hopes to accomplish.

Caesar Rodney rode through Brandywine Hundred on his way to Philadelphia to sign the Declaration of Independence. Five years later, George Washington and the Count de Rochambeau led their army of American and French troops south on the same roads en route to defeating the British army at Yorktown, Virginia, ending the Revolutionary War.

Numerous structures significant to the area’s history – including the Weldin House, Rockwood Museum, the Darley House, the Blue Ball Barn – dot its landscape. And a president of the United States even grew up in Brandywine Hundred.

But, until this year, the area bounded by the Brandywine, the Wilmington city line, the Delaware River and the 12-mile arc that separates Delaware from Pennsylvania did not have its own historical society.

“I was born and raised in Brandywine Hundred, and I kept meeting people with stories in their heads, and it dawned on me that we didn’t have a historical society,” says New Castle County Councilwoman Dee Durham.

It wasn’t for a lack of trying.

Gene Castellano of Sharpley, who has done research on his community and others in the area, recalls an effort in 1998, when the Talleyville Grange building was moved from the median strip in the center of Concord Pike to a site slightly to the east across from the Talleyville Fire Company.

The hope at the time was to make part of the building home to a historical society, according to James Hanby, a local historian whose ancestors in Brandywine Hundred include members of the Hanby and Forwood families. Hanby, who helped arrange the move, said the associated costs were so great that there weren’t any funds left to develop a historical society in the building and the effort came to a halt.

The idea remained dormant for two decades. After Durham was elected to the county council in 2018, representing western Brandywine Hundred, one of her first initiatives was to create a working group to develop ideas to spur preservation of historic properties throughout the county. The Brandywine Hundred Historical Society spun off from that initiative, said Denis Dowse, a retired hotel manager who is serving as the first president of the new organization.

“Dee Durham, she’s our inspiration,” Dowse said. “If it weren’t for her and John Cartier [the councilman representing eastern Brandywine Hundred], we wouldn’t exist.”

Getting started

In the past year or so, the society has had an informal launch, setting up a Facebook page, using Zoom for virtual presentations and stashing them on a YouTube channel.

In March, the society completed the process for achieving recognition as a nonprofit organization. It has established a dues structure ($30 for an individual, $60 for a family) to start building a treasury. The Facebook page now has more than 600 followers, and the society has begun holding monthly in-person meetings and presentations. The Newark Union Church, a recently restored historic site off Baynard Boulevard in central Brandywine Hundred, is currently hosting those meetings.

The paths of the historical society and Newark Union are intertwined.

This mission of the historical society is to “collect, preserve and share the rich history of Brandywine Hundred,” and the Newark Union group is already doing some of that – starting a collection of 18th- and 19th-century artifacts to display in the church and researching the histories of notable Brandywine Hundred residents buried in the adjoining cemetery. Also, Bob Daly, president of the Newark Union Corporation, caretaker of the church and cemetery, is vice president of the historical society.

“[The society’s] goal is to save, preserve and talk about Brandywine Hundred history. This place [Newark Union] is part of it,” Daly said. “We don’t know exactly where we’re going to cross.”

Research is underway

For example, Marian Fischer, the society’s cochair for research, says the group is interested in learning more about some of the 18th- and 19th-century Brandywine Hundred residents who are buried in the area’s cemeteries – finding out where they lived and constructing their family trees.

Some of that work has already begun.

“There are more houses remaining than you might think,” Daly said. “We’ve found 10 to 12 associated with people buried at Newark Union.”

When these homes are identified, Fischer said, society members could inform their owners about historic overlay zoning, a county designation that increases the likelihood that the property will be preserved in future years.

Identifying and researching historic sites throughout the area is another area of interest for the society, said Cathy Andriatis, its communications chair.

Castellano, who is currently researching the history of communities between Concord Pike and the Brandywine for the Woodlawn Trustees, the organization largely responsible for their development, believes there’s a thirst for such information. “Given that what had been dairy farms have become neighborhoods, a lot of people are more interested in what had been there before,” he said.

“It would be good to build a repository of things related to the land, to its previous owners,” he said.

Castellano’s idea meshes with Andriatis’s two-phase communications plan – starting by posting smaller informational items on the society’s Facebook page, then building a website with larger pieces of content on the area’s history.

Regular programming

For now, the society is concentrating on building a following through its monthly meetings, usually held at Newark Union Church. Those meetings are typically drawing 30 to 40 people, Daly and Dowse said, and they’re encouraged that different faces are turning out for each session.

Presentations have covered a wide range of topics, including Delaware’s role in the Revolutionary War, travel on Philadelphia Pike and native plant life. April’s presentation, by Karlis Adamsons, focused on the history and impact of bicycles.

On May 10, Ryan Grover, director of the Rockwood Museum and Park, will discuss the history of the mansion and its grounds. On June 14, journalist Nancy E. Lynch, author of “Vietnam Mailbag: Voices From the War,1968-1972,” will discuss the service of Brandywine Hundred residents during the Vietnam War.

Also in the works is a talk by Brandywine Hundred historian Terry Wright on a June 1909 trolley crash in Hillcrest, just east of Philadelphia Pike, that resulted in more than two dozen injuries. The society is considering having Wright give his presentation at the scene of the crash, near the intersection of Marsh Road and Hillcrest Avenue.

(Check the society’s Facebook page for details on scheduling of these and other programs.)

The to-do list

As a new organization, the society has plenty of items to consider for its agenda.

One task, Dowse said, could be to monitor the meetings of New Castle County’s Historic Review Board, which has oversight over modifications to properties that might have historic significance and from time to time must consider cases of “demolition by neglect,” when a property owner or developer lets a structure deteriorate until it’s practically beyond repair and then seeks permission to tear it down so the land can be put to a potentially more profitable use.

Collecting items for display in a museum-like setting is also possible, Daly said. In gathering items for display at Newark Union, he said he’s amazed at what residents of older homes find in their attics. “The stuff is out there, and people will want to come and see it,” he said.

A long-term need for the society would be a permanent home. Newark Union is fine for meetings – for up to 50 people – but the displays the church group has assembled would leave little room for any substantial collection of Brandywine Hundred artifacts.

“As far as I’m concerned, the society is the guest of Newark Union,” Dowse said.

“In my dream for the future, we’ll likely outgrow that space,” Durham added.

One possibility that Hanby and others have mentioned is the 225-year-old Weldin House, on Philadelphia Pike adjacent to its intersection with Lore Avenue and Marsh Road. The state owns the building and has been renovating it for several years but has not announced plans for its future use.

For now, Dowse hopes to take advantage of the enthusiasm generated through the launch of a new organization. “We have to channel our energy into our research, our preservation of artifacts,” he said.

And, Durham added, “recording those stories that are stuck in people's brains.”

Why have a historical society

“What’s past is prologue,” spoken by Shakespeare’s Antonio in The Tempest, provides a concise summation of the relevance of historical societies.

Terry Wright, president of the Eastern Brandywine Hundred Coordinating Council, a group devoted to local history and community development, offers a similar, albeit longer, explanation: “You have to know your heritage in order to know where your community wants to go.”

The Brandywine Hundred Historical Society is the newest of about 25 such organizations in Delaware – a rough count offered by Mike DiPaolo, who spent 19 years as executive director of the Lewes Historical Society. And DiPaolo, who observed an economic resurgence in Lewes coinciding with an expansion of the society’s offerings, believes an appreciation of local history “brings real dollar value to a community.”

“People are realizing that history isn’t just George Washington and Abraham Lincoln,” said Wright, who is also a member of the Delaware Heritage Commission. “Local history is having a huge renaissance, and it’s not just here.”

Historic societies can have a role in researching hyperlocal historic events and promoting their anniversaries, DiPaolo said. “Every community has its own [anniversaries] and you can’t rely on a big state organization to be aware of every last corner of the state. Having a local organization is really important. It’s community pride.”

The Green

When will Mission BBQ on Concord Pike open? Here are the details

Brisket, pulled pork and spare ribs are coming soon to Concord Pike.Mission BBQ is planning to open in Talleyville's Concord Gallery on Tuesday, Aug. 8. It will be the first Mission BBQ in New Castle County and the second in Delaware, joining a location on Route 13 in Dover.The barbecue restaurant chain serves oak-smoked brisket, pulled pork, sausage, turkey and pulled chicken as entrees or sandwiches. It also off...

Brisket, pulled pork and spare ribs are coming soon to Concord Pike.

Mission BBQ is planning to open in Talleyville's Concord Gallery on Tuesday, Aug. 8. It will be the first Mission BBQ in New Castle County and the second in Delaware, joining a location on Route 13 in Dover.

The barbecue restaurant chain serves oak-smoked brisket, pulled pork, sausage, turkey and pulled chicken as entrees or sandwiches. It also offers St. Louis-style spare ribs; baby back ribs; and a variety of sides, including green beans, fries and baked beans.

NEW CASTLE-AREA WAREHOUSE: Backed with state money, a developer is trying to attract Amazon to new warehouse

The restaurants pay homage to American military personnel, police officers, firefighters and first responders. Badges, equipment and other memorabilia related to local units are featured in each restaurant.

Mission BBQ previously planned to open the Talleyville restaurant in late July. The company did not share a reason for the delay. A dispute between the shopping center's owner, Allied Retail Properties, and neighborhood groups over proposed changes at the center previously slowed construction.

Concord Gallery is currently undergoing a facelift with parts of its brown brick facade getting a coat of gray paint. White support structures have been installed on the roof of the shopping center to raise the signs of each business.

Concord Gallery is just south of Mt. Lebanon Road and across from Giant Brandywine Bikes and an AT&T store on Concord Pike. The shopping center is anchored by Staples and Five Below.

Mission BBQ is taking about half the space previously occupied by Pier 1 Imports at the front right corner of the shopping center. First Watch, the Florida-based brunch chain, will be to the left of the restaurant if you are facing Mission BBQ.

First Watch spokesperson Hunter Carpenter previously said the company plans to open on Concord Pike in "late summer." Construction of the Mission BBQ appears further along than the First Watch.

First Watch is also planning to open a location in The Grove at Newark, the former College Square shopping center off Library Avenue. It eventually will have four sites in New Castle County given existing locations on Geoffrey Drive in Stanton and in Barley Mill in Greenville.

Concord Gallery is also adding The Peach Cobbler Factory, a Nashville-based dessert shop specializing in cobbler, banana pudding and cinnamon rolls. It will be to the left of Playa Bowls where GameStop used to be.

The shopping center has a few remaining vacancies, including the corner opposite First Watch and Mission BBQ that was formerly Bertucci's.

Prior to the Mission BBQ grand opening, a military appreciation night is scheduled for Aug. 4 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The event is open to the public. All sales will be donated to the Global War on Terrorism Memorial Foundation. The first 100 people to purchase an American Heroes Cup will receive free barbecue for a year.

The Concord Pike location will be the 11-year-old Maryland chain's 129th restaurant. The company plans to end the year with more than 135 locations throughout the eastern half of the U.S.

Like knowing what stores, restaurants and developments are coming and going in Delaware? Join our Facebook group What's Going There in Delaware and subscribe to our free What's Going There in Delaware newsletter.

Talleyville's De La Coeur Cafe to move to new, undisclosed locations

The owners of De La Coeur Café et Boulangerie have closed their Talleyville Shopping Center location a little more than a year after taking over the site.Alex Sianni, who owns the business off Silverside Road and Concord Pike with his wife, Gretchen, says the couple is relocating to two new locations."We’ve been in the process of moving," Sianni said Friday. They will be continuing production of artisanal bread and pastries in a separate operation and open a new café.Sianni sa...

The owners of De La Coeur Café et Boulangerie have closed their Talleyville Shopping Center location a little more than a year after taking over the site.

Alex Sianni, who owns the business off Silverside Road and Concord Pike with his wife, Gretchen, says the couple is relocating to two new locations.

"We’ve been in the process of moving," Sianni said Friday. They will be continuing production of artisanal bread and pastries in a separate operation and open a new café.

Sianni said he could not yet disclose the new locations for the bakery and café.

The Sianni's flagship cafe is still operating on Wilmington's Lovering Avenue.

In June 2017, the Siannis took over Bon Appetit Gourmet Food Shoppe Talleyville, a part of the Brandywine Hundred culinary landscape since 1986.

Lewinsky's on Clinton in Delaware City poured last drink

Later that October they renamed it De La Coeur Café et Boulangerie. They renovated the kitchen and installed new ovens, two dough mixers, a proofer and other equipment.

Bon Appetit was founded by Louisette Amblard, a native of Nice, France.

Amblard greeted regulars by name at the charmingly cluttered shop, and was known for her impeccable French-style, tasty sandwiches and classic desserts.

Bon Appetit was acquired in 2014 by Mickey Donatello, who owns the nearby Corner Bistro and Lucky's Coffee Shop, both in Talleyville.

Fried cookies called chrusciki are St. Hedwig's tradition at Polish Festival

The Talleyville café was a second location for the Siannis, who have operated the snug, eight-table De La Coeur Café et Pâtisserie in Wilmington's Forty Acres neighborhood since September 2015.

They bought the former Fresh Thymes Cafe from mother-daughter team Jane and Jenn Adams and changed the name and the offerings from its previous vegetarian-vegan friendly focus.

De La Coeur, in a little bit of fractured French, means "from the heart."

Contact Patricia Talorico at (302) 324-2861 or [email protected] and on Twitter @pattytalorico

New French cafe opens in Talleyville Shopping Center

A longtime Talleyville French-inspired cafe has a new look, new menu and new owners.Bon Appetit Gourmet Food Shoppe Talleyville, a part of the Brandywine Hundred culinary landscape since 1986, is now called De La Coeur Café et Boulangerie.Alex and Gretchen Sianni, owners of the flagship De La Coeur Café et Pâtisserie on Lovering Avenue in Wilmington's Forty Acres neighborhood, took over Bon Appetit in June from former owner Mickey Donatello. They changed the name last week.After extensi...

A longtime Talleyville French-inspired cafe has a new look, new menu and new owners.

Bon Appetit Gourmet Food Shoppe Talleyville, a part of the Brandywine Hundred culinary landscape since 1986, is now called De La Coeur Café et Boulangerie.

Alex and Gretchen Sianni, owners of the flagship De La Coeur Café et Pâtisserie on Lovering Avenue in Wilmington's Forty Acres neighborhood, took over Bon Appetit in June from former owner Mickey Donatello. They changed the name last week.

After extensive kitchen renovations including installing new ovens, two dough mixers, a proofer and other equipment, the couple is now making and baking homemade baguettes, croissants and other pastries at the Talleyville Center eatery off Silverside Road and Concord Pike.

Gretchen Sianni, a University of Delaware graduate with a bachelor of science degree in Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management, has long had a passion for baking. She received a certificate from Le Cordon Bleu in Baking and Pastry Arts.

She said she is excited to now bake all the breads for the Talleyville cafe as well as the Wilmington cafe.

"I have a baking station [in Wilmington] at a 5-foot table and an ancient convection oven. The new shop has an oven that can hold 10 baking trays at once."

"It's been really neat for us to expand our horizons," she said.

Her husband Alex Sianni, who has long worked in sales at Moore Brothers Wine Co. in Wilmington, has recently left the Trolley Square business to concentrate on the two cafes.

The new Talleyville cafe is about three times larger than the snug, 8-table De La Coeur Cafe in Wilmington, which the Siannis have run since September 2015.

They bought the former Fresh Thymes Cafe from mother-daughter team Jane and Jenn Adams and changed the name and the offerings from its previous vegetarian-vegan friendly focus.

De La Coeur, in a little bit of fractured French, means "baking from the heart."

Alex Sianni said while loaves of honey whole wheat and sourdough breads, brioche buns, pretzels and pastries can be purchased at the Talleyville site, the business is no longer a deli or a market. They will not be selling take-out containers of chicken salad or individual cheeses.

"We completely shut down the deli service," he said.

Bon Appetit was founded by Louisette Amblard, a native of Nice, France, who had long been an elegant, continental fixture at the 3629 Silverside Road shop.

Amblard greeted regulars by name at the charmingly cluttered shop, and was known for her impeccable French-style, tasty sandwiches and classic desserts.

In the beginning, the store was half the size it is now. Over time, it doubled to 2,000 square feet with sales growing to a record in 1999.

In addition to sandwiches, salads and soup, Amblard also sold cheeses, paté, gift baskets and European gourmet items.

Gretchen Sianni, who grew up in Hockessin, remembers visiting Amblard's shop when she was a child and being enchanted by the atmosphere and the food.

"I remember sitting down at a table and having one of the best sandwiches of my life," she said.

In 2013, Amblard suffered a debilitating fall in her shop and went through a long recovery period.

During that time, her husband, Jacques, the former general manager of the Hotel du Pont, stepped in to help run the business.

The Amblards sold the business in 2014 to Donatello, who owns the nearby Corner Bistro and Lucky's Coffee Shop, both in Talleyville.

The shop has been listed for sale on a commercial real estate website for about a year.

The Siannis said they plan to serve breakfast and lunch at the 19-table cafe which will be open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. Seating also is available outside.

The menu includes baked oatmeal ($8), ham and gruyere quiche ($9), goat cheese and roasted vegetable panini ($10) and a smoked salmon sandwich with dill cream cheese, capers, tomatoes and red onion ($13). There's also coffee and espresso drinks.

The Siannis don't plan to continuously rotate the menu like they do at their Wilmington cafe, but they are bringing some popular menu items and best sellers they serve there now. Alex Sianni said they hope to eventually apply for a liquor license.

And plans are still in the works for the couple to open Civil Cider, a cider tasting room at Fifth and Shipley streets in downtown Wilmington. The site is the former home of the 4W5 Cafe.

For more information about De La Coeur Café et Boulangerie, call (302) 478-4344 or visit its Facebook page.

Contact Patricia Talorico at (302) 324-2861 or [email protected] and on Twitter @pattytalorico

Mission BBQ finally opens on Concord Pike. First Watch opening in days

As Mission BBQ opens its doors Tuesday on Concord Pike, its neighbor, the brunch restaurant First Watch, is just days from doing the same.First Watch, a Florida-based chain, is planning to open Monday, Aug. 14, according to spokesperson Hunter Carpenter. Mission BBQ and First Watch are replacing the Pier 1 Imports in the Concord Gallery shopping center along the southbound lanes of Concord Pike in Talleyville.The First Watch breakfast menu features a mix of traditional breakfast meals and specials such as strawbe...

As Mission BBQ opens its doors Tuesday on Concord Pike, its neighbor, the brunch restaurant First Watch, is just days from doing the same.

First Watch, a Florida-based chain, is planning to open Monday, Aug. 14, according to spokesperson Hunter Carpenter. Mission BBQ and First Watch are replacing the Pier 1 Imports in the Concord Gallery shopping center along the southbound lanes of Concord Pike in Talleyville.

The First Watch breakfast menu features a mix of traditional breakfast meals and specials such as strawberry tres leches French toast and the lone star brisket hash. The lunch side has salads, quinoa bowls and sandwiches, among other options.

The Florida company, which takes its name from a nautical term, has been in Delaware about five years. The Concord Pike location will be the third First Watch in New Castle County, joining locations on Geoffrey Drive in Stanton and in Barley Mill in Greenville. First Watch is also planning to open a location in The Grove at Newark, the former College Square shopping center off Library Avenue.

Mission BBQ officially opened Tuesday. Photos posted on social media showed lines around the corner for the restaurant's pre-opening events. The barbecue restaurant chain serves oak-smoked brisket, pulled pork, sausage, turkey and pulled chicken as entrees or sandwiches. It also offers St. Louis-style spare ribs; baby back ribs; and a variety of sides, including green beans, fries and baked beans.

The Concord Pike location is the first Mission BBQ in New Castle County and the second in Delaware, joining a location on Route 13 in Dover. Mission BBQ is also planning to open a location in Kirkwood Plaza on Kirkwood Highway, but a timetable for its construction has not been shared.

Concord Gallery is also adding The Peach Cobbler Factory, a Nashville-based dessert shop specializing in cobbler, banana pudding and cinnamon rolls. It will be to the left of Playa Bowls where GameStop used to be.

First Watch will be holding a friends and family event Saturday and Sunday prior to Monday's opening, Carpenter said.

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